First Class Rank Requirement Answers: A Scout’s Guide


For scouts trying to earn their First Class rank, you’re in the right place! In this guide, I’ll be providing you with all of the info that you’ll need to answer each of the BSA’s First Class rank requirements. Get ready to learn some super useful skills that can be applied in every aspect of life!

You’ve reached part 2 of my ultimate guide to the BSA First Class rank! If you’re new to ScoutSmarts, you should first check out part 1 for the answers to requirements 1-5 of the First Class rank.

If you’ve just come over from part one, congratulations! You’re halfway done. Once you finish this rank guide, you’ll be equipped with the knowledge needed to start stepping up as a troop leader and teaching these skills to others. Also, great job making it this far! 😉

Enough said, let’s get back into it! First, take a minute to closely review and think through requirements 6-13 of the First Class rank. Then, it’ll be time to start learning…

What Are The First Class Rank Requirement Answers?

  1. AQUATICS
    • –6a. Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.
    • –6b. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.
    • –6c. Identify the basic parts of a canoe, kayak, or other boat. Identify the parts of a paddle or an oar.
    • –6d. Describe proper body positioning in a watercraft, depending on the type and size of the vessel. Explain the importance of proper body position in the boat.
    • –6e. With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and as rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water.)
  2. FIRST AID and EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
    • –7a. Demonstrate bandages for a sprained ankle and for injuries on the head, the upper arm, and the collarbone.
    • –7b. By yourself and with a partner, show how to:
      • –7bI. Transport a person from a smoke-filled room.
        –7bII.Transport for at least 25 yards a person with a sprained ankle.
    • –7c. Tell the five most common signals of a heart attack. Explain the steps (procedures) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
    • –7d. Tell what utility services exist in your home or meeting place. Describe potential hazards associated with these utilities and tell how to respond in emergency situations.
    • –7e. Develop an emergency action plan for your home that includes what to do in case of fire, storm, power outage, and water outage.
    • –7f. Explain how to obtain potable water in an emergency.
  3. FITNESS
    • –8a. After completing Second Class requirement 7a, be physically active at least 30 minutes each day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.
    • –8b. Share your challenges and successes in completing First Class requirement 8a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life.
  4. CITIZENSHIP
    • –9a. Visit and discuss with a selected individual approved by your leader (for example, an elected official, judge, attorney, civil servant, principal, or teacher) the constitutional rights and obligations of a U.S. citizen.
    • –9b. Investigate an environmental issue affecting your community. Share what you learned about that issue with your patrol or troop. Tell what, if anything, could be done by you or your community to address the concern.
    • –9c. On a Scouting or family outing, take note of the trash and garbage you produce. Before your next similar outing, decide how you can reduce, recycle, or repurpose what you take on that outing, and then put those plans into action. Compare your results.
    • –9d. Participate in three hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. The project(s) must not be the same service project(s) used for Tenderfoot requirement 7b and Second Class requirement 8e. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout Law.
  5. LEADERSHIP
    • –10. Tell someone who is eligible to join Scouts BSA, or an inactive Scout, about your Scouting activities. Invite this person to an outing, activity, service project, or meeting. Provide information on how to join, or encourage the inactive Scout to become active. Share your efforts with your Scoutmaster or other adult leader.
  6. SCOUT SPIRIT
    • 11. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (different from those points used for previous ranks) in your everyday life.
  7. SCOUTMASTER CONFERENCE
    • 12. While working toward the First Class rank and after completing Second Class requirement 11, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
  8. BOARD OF REVIEW
    • 13. Successfully complete your board of review for the First Class rank.

Requirements 6a-6e: Aquatics

Aquatic activities were something that I always looked forward to doing as a scout! Before we can dive in though (pun intended), you’ll need to understand and follow BSA-approved precautions for water safety.

In this requirement, I’ll be helping you to understand the precautions needed for a safe trip afloat, name parts of a boat, safely ride in a watercraft, and even pass the BSA swim test. Let’s begin! 😀

6a) Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.

Before you’re allowed to participate in any aquatic outing, you must prove that you can hold your own in the water. To see if you’re up for the challenge, the BSA requires that you pass the BSA Swimmer’s Test.

For a detailed walk-through of this swim test and its requirements, check out my guide on Understanding and Passing the BSA Swim Test. In my guide, I go over everything covered in the test, along with some ninja tips to make your swim so much easier!

6b) Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.

A good portion of your aquatic outings will involve some type of boat. No matter the type of watercraft, you’ll need to follow the BSA’s Safety Afloat rules, which outline nine safe practices to follow when taking a trip on the water.

Aquatic activities come with their own set of potential dangers, but understanding these nine points will help to prepare for anything and reduce your risk of accidents. Below is a quick run-down of the BSA’s Safety Afloat principles:

  1. Qualified Supervision: The BSA requires at least one adult (21+) supervisor for every 10 scouts. One supervisor needs to be trained in CPR in case there’s an accident.
  2. Personal Health Review: Before going on any aquatic outing, your troop will require you to turn in your current and complete health history. Understanding personal health risks is a big part of preparedness!
  3. Swimming Ability: Every year, you’ll need to prove that you can effectively swim on your own by passing a BSA-run swim test.
  4. Life Jackets: For any boating activity, you’re required to wear life jackets approved by the U.S. Coast Guard.
  5. Buddy System: Stay with a buddy during any boating activity. In the case that someone gets hurt or lost, one buddy can alert others for help.
  6. Skill Proficiency: Before you step foot onto any boat, you’ll need to thoroughly understand the basic safety rules for that type of watercraft. This is something we’ll go over in requirements 6c and 6d!
  7. Planning: Always check the weather and other factors ahead of time. Bad weather could lead to a dangerous trip afloat.
  8. Equipment: Check your equipment before it goes out into the water. If your equipment isn’t suitable, don’t use it!
  9. Discipline: Following instructions is usually pretty simple, but in this case it’s also extremely important. When you’re on the water, always follow the rules and keep safety front of mind.

The nine points of Safety Afloat are a key part of staying safe on any boating trip, so be sure that you’ve got them memorized. While these points might just seem like extra rules, they allow you and your troop to have a ton of aquatic fun– while still staying safe! 🙂

6c) Identify the basic parts of a canoe, kayak, or other boat. Identify the parts of a paddle or an oar.

Canoes and kayaks are small boats that require paddling and can fit one or more passengers. They’re fantastic for fishing or exploring, and a lot of fun to use! If your troop is like mine, you’ll likely use one or both at some point in your Scouting career.

For this requirement, you’ll need to be able to discern the basic parts of a canoe, kayak, or other boat, along with the parts of a paddle or oar. Below is a great video explanation (3:48) of the various parts of a canoe and paddle. As you’ll see, a lot of the terminology is the same used for larger boats!

Here’s a trick to help you memorize these terms: draw a picture and label each part. Then, you can study your diagram before getting the requirement signed off! Knowing the names of each boat part will really really help your communication on the water (link to my Comm MB guide!). 🙂

6d) Describe proper body positioning in a watercraft, depending on the type and size of the vessel. Explain the importance of proper body position in the boat.

Your body’s positioning in boats is important, especially when you’re on a smaller vessel like a kayak or a canoe. Since these watercrafts are fairly light, they can easily capsize (flip over) if you’re not paying attention to how your weight is distributed.

Fliping a canoe or kayak back over and draining it isn’t really a fun time, especially if your belongings get wet. So, right now you’ll learn how to avoid that from happening! Below are some positioning basics for canoes, kayaks, and larger boats:

CanoeCanoes usually fit more than one person. If you’re canoeing alone, you should always sit in the back. Otherwise, the heaviest person sits in the back. Face forward and try not to lean too far to either side.
KayakMost kayaks fit a single person. You’ll want to face forward, sit flat, and stick your legs out. Remain upright and don’t slouch or tilt too much as you might tip the boat.
Large WatercraftIn larger water crafts, you’ll likely have a lot of room to sit or stand. If the boat is moving, you should be seated. You should only move around if you have something to hold onto. Make sure not to lean over the side so you don’t go overboard.

Basically, the key is to stay low, keep your center of balance stable, and not lean out over the sides if you’re feeling unsteady. By maintaining proper positioning and keeping your boat steady, you’ll have a much safer and drier time afloat. Sounds like a win to me!

6e) With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water.)

Aquatic activities are not without danger, so strong rescue skills are a must-have! For this requirement, you’ll need to be able to demonstrate a line rescue (aka a throw rescue) as both the victim and rescuer.

For a detailed explanation and video demonstrating the throw rescue, check out requirement 4 of my guide to the Lifesaving merit badge. There, you’ll learn how to properly throw a line and help the victim to shore! Don’t worry if your throw is short on your first try. Practice makes perfect! 😉

Requirements 7a-7f: First Aid and Emergency Preparedness

It goes without saying that first aid and emergency preparedness are foundational skills for any scout to have. Since you may not always have immediate access to a hospital, it’s important that you know how to respond to injuries and danger quickly!

Much of what we’ll cover is required for both the First Aid and Emergency Preparedness merit badges, so I’ll be referencing those guides. Since there’s some overlap between these requirements and those badges, you can kill two birds with one stone by starting your blue card now! 😀

7a) Demonstrate bandages for a sprained ankle and for injuries on the head, the upper arm, and the collarbone.

In this section, we’ll be focusing on treating sprained ankles, along with injuries to the head, upper arm, and collarbone. You probably know someone who had one of these injuries, as they’re pretty common. Now, you can learn how to properly bandage these wounds up!

The main things to keep in mind when performing first aid are to immobilize strained or damaged areas and prevent bleeding by applying pressure over wounds with a sterile bandage. To see the proper technique for bandaging different injuries, check out this helpful PDF.

You should also take a look at my First Aid merit badge guide and use CTRL+F to search for each term. By doing that, you’ll get a great explanation of everything to consider when treating these injuries. It’s too much detail to go into here, but this info is a must-know!

7b) By yourself and with a partner, show how to:
Transport a person from a smoke-filled room
Transport for at least 25 yards a person with a sprained ankle.

With the help of a willing scout, demonstrate that you know how to save someone from a smoke-filled room and properly move someone with a sprained ankle at least 25 yards. The best method to use will depend on your age, size, and strength.

Did you know that most fire-related deaths are not caused by burns but actually smoke inhalation? This is because inhaling smoke makes it difficult to breathe and can quickly cause you to become disoriented and fall unconcious.

If you’re ever in a fire, make sure you and your family cover your airways and stay close to the ground while quickly escaping, since smoke naturally rises!

Hopefully, you’ll never be in a situation where you need to save someone from a smoke-filled room, but emergency preparedness is all about being prepared for the worst. Now, there are three different carries, ideal for smaller scouts, which are shown in the video (0:46) below:

For scouts who are older or exceptionally strong, the fireman’s carry is a faster and safer option for transporting someone who can’t walk on their own or is unconscious. This method involves carrying someone over your shoulders and on your back. You can check out the specific steps here.

Transporting Someone With a Sprained Ankle

Next up is helping transport someone with a sprained ankle for a minimum distance of 25 yards. You may want to find a scout who is light enough for you to carry. However, if you use the technique properly, you should be able to help just about anyone!

The walking assist is the easiest way to help move someone with an ankle injury without causing further harm. Sling their arm over your shoulder and wrap your arm around their waist, letting them lean on you for support. Allow them to use you as a crutch, and use their good leg to move forward.

7c) Tell the five most common signals of a heart attack. Explain the steps (procedures) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).

A heart attack is an extremely serious medical emergency. They occur when a blockage prevents adequate blood flow from reaching the heart. Left untreated, a heart attack can be fatal, so it’s critical you act promptly if someone experiences erratic heartbeats or sudden chest pain.

To know when a heart attack is taking place, familiarize yourself with the five most common signs of a heart attack or cardiac arrest:

  1. Sharp pain, squeezing, or discomfort — often in the center or left side of your chest
  2. Feeling light-headed, faint, or weak. 
  3. Feeling short of breath.
  4. Pain or discomfort in the jaw, neck, or back.
  5. Pain or discomfort in your arms or shoulders

If someone is having a heart attack, immediately instruct a witness to call 911. You will not need to do CPR chest compressions unless the victim stops breathing entirely. Instead, try to get them to a hospital immediately if they can still move.

If the victim’s heart stops, they fall unconscious, or are not breathing, you should use an AED and perform CPR to prolong their life and reduce the onset of damage. Locate an AED, attach the sensors to the chest of the victim, and follow the displayed instructions.

I actually asked a friend of mine who works in the medical field to write a full article on the best practices for treating a heart attack by using CPR and an AED.

You gotta check it out if you want to be 100% prepared! Even though it’s a pretty detailed explanation, heart attacks are surprisingly common, so this info is vital to know.

Heart-related illnesses kill more people in the US than any other cause. Some factors that put people at greater risk of a heart attack are age, tobacco use, and obesity. The best things you can do to prevent a heart attack are to avoid smoking, stick to a healthy diet, and exercise regularly!

7d) Tell what utility services exist in your home or meeting place. Describe potential hazards associated with these utilities, and tell how to respond in emergency situations.

While utility-related hazards are much less likely to happen nowadays thanks to modern safety measures, they’re still possible. In case something does happen though, you’ll need to know how to act! Below, I’ll go over a few common utilities and some dangers associated with each:

GasA gas leak can lead to fires, explosions, and poisoning, which can cause severe injuries and even death. The easiest way to tell if there’s a gas leak nearby is by scent. Household gas is made to smell like sulfur/rotten eggs to be more easily detectible. If you smell a rotten egg scent, alert 911 and vacate the location immediately. For more info on handling a gas leak, take a look at this article.
ElectricThe biggest dangers associated with electricity are electric shock, burns, and fires. Unprotected wires can spark, and overburdened outlets can catch fire. The best thing you can do is turn off the power and contact a licensed electrician to fix the issue. In more serious cases/fires, call 911 and leave immediately.
WaterWith water, there’s always a chance of flooding, which can be disastrous in severe cases. Some causes of floods include heavy rainfall, broken pipes, or running faucets. If your house is flooding, stop the water at its source if possible. Also, make sure to turn off the electricity, avoid going into flooding water, evacuate, and call 911.

Above all else, be cautious and stay safe when responding. If you’re ever unsure, leave it to the pros — evacuate your family immediately and call 911. Hopefully, none of these situations ever happen to you. However, the important thing is to learn how to respond quickly and safely! 🙂

7e) Develop an emergency action plan for your home that includes what to do in case of fire, storm, power outage, and water outage.

Planning ahead can make all the difference because when an emergency happens, you’ll be prepared. For this requirement, create an emergency action plan for you and your family to follow in case of these four events: fire, storm, power outage, and water outage.

Before we get into the details, know that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) considers 5 aspects of emergency preparedness to keep in mind for an emergency action plan: prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery. Here’s what each one means:

  1. Prevention: What are some of the possible hazards of this activity? The best way to handle an emergency is to prevent it from occurring in the first place. As a scout, this means that you should always be on the lookout for potential risks. Prevention means that if you identify a dangerous situation, you’ll immediately take steps to stop any damage or harm from occurring.
  2. Protection: If an emergency does occur, what can I do beforehand to make sure that those involved are not harmed? Be prepared. Protection means taking early actions that can reduce the damage caused by a threat. Know what steps to take, beforehand. Shelters and guards are both forms of protection that can lessen the impact of an emergency.
  3. Mitigation: How can I help to lessen the likelihood and impact of an emergency? Look for ways to make things ‘less bad’. Mitigation means putting plans in place to lessen the damage caused by an emergency. Clearly marking safety exits and mapping out escape plans are both ways of lessening the possible damage caused by an emergency.
  4. Response: If the emergency does occur, what steps could be taken to prevent further injuries or damages? Your response should be to take action. Responding to an emergency means first assessing the situation. Then, preventing further damages, injuries, and panic. Examples of an effective response force are firefighters and on-campus safety teams who can quickly arrive at the scene of an emergency.
  5. Recovery: How can we lessen the damages caused by this emergency and spur a faster healing process? Consider how you’d act after experiencing a crisis. Recovery means responding to the situation so that the victims’ mental and physical states can improve as quickly as possible. Urgent medical treatments and post-emergency psychological care are both examples of methods that quicken recovery.

Now that you know the 5 phases of an emergency action plan, let’s apply them to 4 common types of home disasters! Below, I’ll give you a few key pointers for each emergency, but you should also consider how the 5 aspects of emergency preparedness fit in when speaking with your Scoutmaster.

  • Fire: Always identify at least 2 possible exits to escape from any room. Know how to navigate out of your house and to a safe area outside by just using your sense of touch. Make sure your entire family knows to leave the burning building immediately and stay outside — lives are more important than posessions.
  • Storm: If you’re given the order to evacuate beforehand, do it. If you can’t evacuate, try to head into a basement or structurally sound area away from anything that could fall on someone. Sheltering under a table can work in a pinch. Also, make sure you also have a complete emergency kit, as rescue services can be slow to respond in extreme storms.
  • Power Outage: Monitor any alerts using your phone, or call 911 to report the outage. Avoid opening your refrigiratior and freezer to keep your food cold. If in doubt, throw it out. Never use a generator, heaters, or an open-fire stove indoors as this will cause CO2 poisoning. If your home becomes unsafe, identify a location to escape to, beforehand.
  • Water Outage: If you know a hurricane or approaching disaster may cause a water outage, fill your tub with clean water completely, beforehand. Also, stock clean drinking water or purification tablets (Amazon link) at home.
7f) Explain how to obtain potable water in an emergency.

Potable water is just another way of saying safe drinking water. Oftentimes, emergencies can leave you stranded in the middle of nowhere, but knowing how to obtain potable water can prevent dehydration and save your life! 😀

If you’re in an emergency situation, always remember to look for water before food. All cells in your body need water to function. The average person can only survive about 3 days without water but can survive a month or more without food.

Let’s say you’ve found water but are unsure if it’s safe enough to drink. Here are some basic tricks to make unclean water drinkable in an emergency situation:

  • Boiling: Boiling water is the most tried and true way to get clean water. By boiling water, you kill viruses, bacteria, and parasites, which could make you sick otherwise. You should also try to filter the water to avoid drinking any debris like sand or small rocks.
  • Filters: A travel water filter is a good thing to keep in your car or backpack. Instead of killing viruses/bacteria/parasites, a filter separates them out so you’re only left with clean water.
  • Chlorine Tablets: Chlorine tablets can be mixed with water to disinfect it from waterborne pathogens. This is the same process your local water company uses, just on a smaller scale. However, like boiling, tablets don’t remove debris in water.

It’s recommended you use more than one of these processes when purifying water to ensure that what you’re drinking is as clean as possible. For more information on each method, check out this helpful CDC article on water purification.

Requirement 8a-8b: Fitness

Staying “physically strong” is something that you promise every time you recite the Scout Oath. That doesn’t mean you need to be a super-strong powerlifter, but you do need to be physically capable. On your Scouting journey, you’ll participate in many activities that promote long-term fitness.

In this requirement, we’ll be expanding upon what you learned as a Second Class scout, and furthering your fitness. You’ll need to continue your physical activity for another four weeks and discuss this journey with your Scoutmaster to complete this requirement!

8a) After completing Second Class requirement 7a, be physically active at least 30 minutes every day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.

Hopefully, you’ve been physically active since completing requirement 7a for Second Class. If not though, there’s no better time to start than the present! Try to stay physically active at least 30 minutes every day for five days a week over the next month.

This requirement is also a great opportunity to start working on your Eagle-required Personal Fitness merit badge! In earning this badge, you’ll learn how to live a healthy lifestyle and have more energy to accomplish the goals most important to you.

Also, you don’t have to do the same exercises as you did last time. If you want to change things up, go for it! A big part of staying fit is making exercise fun so that it’s easy to do. Just make sure you record your progress so you can show your Scoutmaster when you’re done.

8b) Share your challenges and successes in completing First Class requirement 8a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life.

Once you’ve completed your four weeks, sit down with your counselor and discuss what you did and how it went. When discussing your exercise routine, talk about what you enjoyed and what you found challenging. Based on what was difficult, make a plan to improve in the future.

If you feel like it’s difficult or boring to keep up with an exercise routine, I get it. Believe it or not, I was kind of a pudgy kid until about 8th grade! What changed? I joined my school’s cross country team with a few buddies. While I was awful at first, I got better, made new friends, and had a blast!

Seriously, even if you’re a bit shy or unconfident, I’d really encourage you to participate in group sports. Like Scouting, sports teach persistence, teamwork, and self-esteem. Plus, participating in these types of activities will help you to stay physically fit and lead a healthy lifestyle! 🙂

Requirement 9a-9d: Citizenship

Being a good citizen is another key aspect of Scouting. As a scout, the importance of your community, country, and the world is something that’s often reinforced. Just like with your other ranks, this requirement will encourage you to get involved in your community and make a difference!

In this requirement, you’ll be meeting with local officials, investigating issues, helping your community, and keeping track of your impact. This requirement is super important, especially in the real world. Much of this knowledge will help you become a more conscious, responsible adult!

9a) Visit and discuss with a selected individual approved by your leader (for example, an elected official, judge, attorney, civil servant, principal, or teacher) the constitutional rights and obligations of a U.S. citizen.

For this requirement, you’ll meet with an official within your community to discuss your constitutional rights and role as a US citizen. For more help starting a conversation with your official, take a look at Citizen in the Community merit badge requirement 4. BTW, this badge is Eagle-required!

If you’re having a tricky time deciding on who to talk to, I’d suggest speaking with your Scoutmaster or an older scout and asking who they’d recommend. Fun fact, the older scouts all had to do this requirement too!

Having the recommendation and knowing mutual friends will make reaching out to your official so much easier!

Before you head out to your meeting, I’d recommend going over your constitutional rights and obligations. then, write down any questions you can think of. Also, be super respectful since they’re setting aside time for you. Here are a few questions you could consider asking:

  • What is your job, and how do you feel it makes our country a better place?
  • Which part of your work do you enjoy most?
  • If you had to say, what’s the most important thing you do?
  • What kind of schooling/education would I need to to do what you do?
  • What do you think our obligations are as US citizens?
  • How would you describe our constitutional rights? Would you change anything?

I’d recommend noting down the most important points right after your first meeting, while everything is top of mind. Once finished, get ready to have another exciting conversation with your Scoutmaster to discuss what you’ve learned! This is an awesome requirement, so enjoy it and learn all you can. 🙂

9b) Investigate an environmental issue affecting your community. Share what you learned about that issue with your patrol or troop. Tell what, if anything, could be done by you or your community to address the concern.

Next, look for an environmental issue affecting your community. If you’re struggling to find one, you can ask your parents or a Scoutmaster, check local forums, read the newspaper, or just Google it! Often, the most common issues are related to pollution, invasive species, or wildfires.

Once you identify your issue, it’s time for the fun part: investigating further! See what people are saying, do some research, write things down, and formulate some solutions. Think about if there’s anything you or your troop can do to help. Then, present your findings at your next meeting! 😀

9c) On a Scouting or family outing, take note of the trash and garbage you produce. Before your next similar outing, decide how you can reduce, recycle, or repurpose what you take on that outing, and then put those plans into action. Compare your results.

Humans produce a lot of garbage, whether we’re aware of it or not. This garbage has to go somewhere. Every time we throw something away, it doesn’t just disappear. Waste is an ever-growing issue, which is why it’s a topic that we’ll be covering right now!

Action Step: On your next outing, take a look at how much trash you produce. Why is there so much? What can be recycled or repurposed? What can you simply avoid bringing in the first place?

During the following trip, use what you learned to be more conscious of your trash and separate anything recyclable or reusable. Note the significant differences, and talk to your counseler about making your waste-reduction plans permanent!

Waste management and sustainability go hand-in-hand, so now would also be a great time to get started on your Eagle-required Sustainability merit badge! This requirement will be the perfect jumping-off point to start learning more about the importance of sustainable living.

9d) Participate in three hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. The project(s) must not be the same service project(s) used for Tenderfoot requirement 7b and Second Class requirement 8e. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout Law.

Service is a huge part of Scouting, and something you should continue to do even after earning Eagle. There are lots of different service projects you can participate in, but just make sure to get it approved by your Scoutmaster before starting.

Helping another scout with their Eagle project is a great way to knock out these hours. Just remember to log it in your handbook to later discuss with your Scoutmaster, and you’re good to go!

If you’re in a hurry to complete this requirement, you can also volunteer with your school, church, or local community center. Simply speak with the person in charge and ask them if you can help out. Don’t forget to have them sign a form to verify your work once finished!

Requirement 10: Leadership

10a) Tell someone who is eligible to join Scouts BSA, or an inactive Scout, about your Scouting activities. Invite this person to an outing, activity, service project or meeting. Provide information on how to join, or encourage the inactive Scout to become active. Share your efforts with your Scoutmaster or other adult leader.

Once you become a First Class scout, your troop will start expecting you to step up as a leader. One way to do this is by encouraging others to get more involved in Scouting! For this requirement, you’re tasked with sharing your Scouting experiences with a buddy. 🙂

Invite a friend or inactive scout to join you at a fun troop activity. Make sure to tell them about your favorite parts of Scouting, and find out what they’re interested in doing. If they seem remotely interested, help them speak with their parents to get all of the details sorted out!

On the day of the actual event, make sure to follow up with them so that they come. Then, get this requirement signed off by your Scoutmaster! For more info on encouraging your friends to join your troop, check out my helpful guide to Effective Scout Recruiting.

Requirement 11: Scout Spirit

11) Demonstrate scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (different from those points used for previous ranks) in your everyday life.

You’re almost there, keep it up! The final requirement for First Class is… you guessed it: scout spirit! Like in the previous ranks, you’ll be discussing the Scout Oath and Law, as well as completing a Board of Review along with a Scoutmaster Conference. Good luck! 😀

You should be very familiar with this part already. Show how you’ve lived by the Scout Oath and Law and done your duty to God on your journey to First Class. Remember to discuss different Scout Law points than the ones you talked about before.

12) While working toward the First Class rank, and after completing Second Class requirement 11, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

Now that we’ve gotten this far, it’s time for your Scoutmaster conference! It might be nerve-racking, but you can do it! Explain to your Scoutmaster what you’ve learned while completing First Class and how it has helped you become a better scout who’s capable of earning Eagle.

For this Scoutmaster conference, you’ll mainly be discussing your growth in the troop and your readiness to step up as a leader. For some example questions and ways to prep, I’d suggest checking out my article on Scoutmaster Conferences!

13) Successfully complete your board of review for the First Class rank.

Last but not least is your Board of Review! This is your chance to reflect on everything you’ve learned so far. Make sure that you’re dressed in your full Class-A uniform, you know all of your scout sayings, and be prepared to talk about specific experiences. You got this! 🙂

(Click here to return to part 1 of my guide to the BSA First Class Rank Requirements!)

Congratulations on Finishing Your First Class Rank!

Congrats! You’ve just completed another major milestone in Scouting. You’re now a much more knowledgeable scout thanks to your hard work and dedication — and one step closer to earning Eagle! Give yourself a huge pat on the back for me. 😀

If this article helped you out, I’ve also created some other resources to continue supporting you on your Scouting journey! Now that you’re a First Class scout, I’d highly recommend checking out any of the following articles if they spark your interest:

Thanks again for reading, and for making our world a better place through Scouting! If you haven’t already, make sure to sign up for my newsletter where you’ll find giveaways, helpful Scouting + life tips, and more. See you there soon, and, until next time, happy Scouting!

Cole

I'm constantly writing new content because I believe in Scouts like you! Thanks so much for reading, and for making our world a better place. Until next time, I'm wishing you all the best on your journey to Eagle and beyond!

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