The First Aid Merit Badge: Your Ultimate Guide In 2020


Quick! You’re on a 10-mile hike and one of the younger scouts has just collapsed and appears unresponsive. What do you do? Luckily, once you have the Eagle-required, First Aid merit badge, you’ll be prepared to handle this type of emergency, as well as many others.

If you’re following along with the merit badge worksheet, this guide will provide you with all the answers to the requirements needed to learn the First Aid merit badge. Afterward, you’ll be equipped to handle almost any medical emergency and have the ability to save lives. Grab some buddies! First Aid is most fun when completed as a group of scouts.

Before we get started, if you have other Eagle-required merit badges to earn, I’d recommend checking out my Difficulty Ranking Guide to Every Eagle-required Badge. There, you’ll also find the links to my other merit badge guides, as well as a description and summary of each badge’s requirements. I’m certain this resource will be helpful to scouts on their road to Eagle!

Also, remember that ScoutSmarts should just serve as your starting point for merit badge research. In school, we’re taught not to plagiarize, and the same is true for Scouting worksheets. Answer these questions in your own words, do further research, and I promise you’ll gain much more from every merit badge you earn!

Before you dive into this merit badge, I’d highly recommend purchasing a reliable first aid kit to accompany you on your Scouting adventures. This Survival First Aid Kit on Amazon not only provides all of the medical equipment you’ll need, It can also help save your life if you’re stranded in the wild!

Take your time to read through the official First Aid merit badge requirements below. This badge will take multiple days to earn, and an experienced scout always remembers to plan ahead. The slow and steady method isn’t just the best way to earn the First Aid merit badge, it’s the key to reaching your Eagle rank as well! 🙂

What Are The First Aid Merit Badge Requirements?

  1. Demonstrate to your counselor that you have current knowledge of all first-aid requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks.
  2. Explain how you would obtain emergency medical assistance from:
    a. Your home
    b. A remote location on a wilderness camping trip
    c. An activity on open water
  3. Define the term triage. Explain the steps necessary to assess and handle a medical emergency until help arrives.
  4. Explain the universal precautions as applied to the transmission of infections. Discuss the ways you should protect yourself and the victim while administering first aid.
  5. Do the following:
    a. Prepare a first-aid kit for your home. Display and discuss its contents with your counselor.
    b. With an adult leader. Inspect your troop’s first-aid kit. Evaluate it for completeness. Report your findings to your counselor and Scout leader.
  6. Describe the early signs and symptoms of each of the following and explain what actions you should take:
    a. Shock
    b. Heart attack
    c. Stroke
  7. Do the following:
    a. Describe the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Then demonstrate proper CPR technique using a training device approved by your counselor.
    b. Explain the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Identify the location of the AED at your school, place of worship, and troop meeting place, if one is present.
  8. Do the following:
    a. Show the steps that need to be taken for someone who has a large open wound or cut that is not bleeding severely.
    b. Show the steps that need to be taken for someone who has a large open wound or cut that is severely bleeding.
    c. Tell the dangers in the use of a tourniquet and the conditions under which its use is justified.
  9. Explain when a bee sting could be life-threatening and what action should be taken for prevention and for first aid.
  10. Describe the signs and symptoms and demonstrate the proper procedures for handling and immobilizing suspected closed and open fractures or dislocations of the
    a. Forearm
    b. Wrist
    c. Upper leg
    d. Lower leg
    e. Ankle
  11. Describe the signs, symptoms, and possible complications and demonstrate care for someone with a suspected injury to the head, neck, or back.
  12. Describe the symptoms, proper first-aid procedures, and possible prevention measures for the following conditions:
    a. Anaphylaxis/allergic reactions
    b. Bruises
    c. Sprains or strains
    d. Hypothermia
    e. Frostbite
    f. Burns—first, second, and third degree
    g. Convulsions/seizures
    h. Dehydration
    i. Muscle cramps
    j. Heat exhaustion
    k. Heat stroke
    l. Abdominal pain
    m. Broken, chipped, or loosened tooth
  13. Do the following:
    a. Describe the conditions under which an injured person should be moved.
    b. If a sick or an injured person must be moved, tell how you would determine the best method. Demonstrate this method.
    c. With helpers under your supervision, improvise a stretcher and move a presumably unconscious person.
  14. Teach another Scout a first-aid skill selected by your counselor.

Before we dive into the details, let’s discuss what exactly needs to be done before earning the First Aid merit badge. You’ll be required to explain, demonstrate, and act out many skills related to treating an injured person, which you’ll be learning in this guide. In the process, you’ll learn CPR, prepare your own first aid kit for emergencies and even improvise methods of transporting an injured person!

1) Demonstrate to your counselor that you have current knowledge of all first-aid requirements for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks.

At the end of your merit badge workbook should be a section that recaps the first aid requirements for Tenderfoot through First Class. I’d like to help you to answer each of these, but there are more than 20 topics that should be covered, which would be too much to include in this guide. Here are the first aid answers for Tenderfoot.

Luckily, you should already know most of the answers from your own Scouting experience. Take the time to review each first aid concept with your merit badge counselor.

Explain how you would obtain emergency medical assistance from:
2a) Your home

Calling 911 is the simplest and most effective way to reach emergency medical services from home. When speaking with a 911 dispatcher, immediately inform them of 4 things:

  1. The emergency: Use as much detail as possible to quickly describe the emergency. Instead of saying “my friend is unconscious” say, “My friend fell off a 6 ft ledge and hit his head. He’s breathing and not bleeding, but is currently unconscious, and has been for the last 3 minutes.”
  2. What’s currently happening: Is anyone performing CPR or taking first-aid measures? Quickly tell the dispatcher how the situation is being handled.
  3. Your location: Be as precise as possible when describing your location. Instead of saying an address or a school’s name, say, “I’m by the bleachers next to the football field of x school.” Send someone to meet with and guide the responders to you, if possible.
  4. Your phone number: EMS may need to call you back if they are unable to find you. In case your call disconnects, make sure to give the dispatcher the phone number that you’re currently calling from.

Stay on the line until help arrives and be sure not to leave the victim unattended.

Poison control can also be reached at 1-800-222-1222, but should only be called in poisoning instances which are not immediately life-threatening. If phones are unavailable, seek help from a neighbor. You do this by shouting, if possible, so as not to leave the victim unattended.

2b) A remote location on a wilderness camping trip

Before embarking on any wilderness outing, be sure to inform a trusted adult of your plans. Tell them the trip’s location and expected duration so that in an emergency situation they will be able to contact and dispatch rescue services to you. 

Oftentimes, you will be able to contact emergency personnel by cell phone. However, if you are unable to do so but are relatively close to civilization, you should send people back in vehicles who will call for help from the nearest phone.

If lost, do not leave your vehicle or campground. Larger objects are more likely to be found by rescue personnel. Signal fires should only be used as a last resort. Do not start a forest fire.

To truly be prepared to camp safely, I’d highly recommend checking out my Ultimate Guide To The Camping Merit Badge!

2c) An activity on open water

Every vessel should be equipped with a Marine VHF radio which can be used to contact help on emergency channel #16. If the boat can be moved, navigate it into more trafficked water and signal for help.

Flying a flag upside down from a boat is also an international sign for distress, and should be done if no immediate rescuers are in sight. If rescuers are visible, signal to them by lighting flares, waving a brightly colored shirt, or by using smoke.

3) Define the term triage. Explain the steps necessary to assess and handle a medical emergency until help arrives.

In a situation where multiple people are injured, triage refers to the process of determining the extent of each individual’s injuries, then prioritizing their order of treatment based on severity. Basically, you’ll assess how injured each of the victims are, then treat those with life-threatening injuries before those with minor injuries so that the most people can survive.

There are different types of triage techniques, but they almost all rely on grouping patients into 3 main categories. Watch the video (6:09) below for an in-depth understanding of the SALT Triage system:

To recap what you’ve just learned, triaging is done when there is insufficient medical personnel to ensure the most survivors. To properly triage, you must first assess the victim’s condition. First, examine these four factors:

  • Airway
  • Breathing
  • Circulation/Coma/Convulsion
  • Dehydration (severe)

If the victim is critically at risk in any of these areas, they’re deemed an ‘emergency (Red)’ case and receive treatment as soon as possible. If the victim is exhibiting symptoms that appear not to be immediately life-threatening, they are deemed as a ‘priority (Yellow),’ and receive treatment following the emergency cases. Non-urgent issues are placed into ‘queue (Green)’ and are handled after the priority cases.

4) Explain the universal precautions as applied to the transmission of infections. Discuss the ways you should protect yourself and the victim while administering first aid.

Contact with bodily fluids can lead to the transmission of bloodborne pathogens. These pathogens can cause you illness and infection. One should always treat bodily fluids with caution and use protective barriers to prevent contact, when possible. Never use your bare hands to prevent bleeding, as this could put both you and the victim at risk of infection.

Make sure, after administering first aid, to safely disinfect or discard all contaminated items and thoroughly wash your hands with soap. To not infect others, biological waste should be put in designated receptacles or bagged twice before disposal.

Do the following:
5
a) Prepare a first-aid kit for your home. Display and discuss its contents with your counselor.
5b) With an adult leader. Inspect your troop’s first-aid kit. Evaluate it for completeness. Report your findings to your counselor and Scout leader.

To learn about some of the the first aid essentials you’ll need in your home and vehicle, watch the following video (4:05):

The picture below gives you an example of what you might typically find in a great first-aid kit. The Survival First Aid Kit I found on Amazon has all of these things and more, so I’d highly recommend it if you’re looking for a compact and dependable first aid kit. Below are the elements of a great first aid kit, with each item number corresponding to the item’s name:

At the very least, the first aid kit you purchase should be equipped with:

  • Bandages
  • Gauze Pads
  • Gloves
  • Sting Relief
  • Elastic Bandages
  • Tweezers
  • Antiseptic Wipes
  • CPR Masks
  • Moleskin Blister Covers
  • Safety Pins

You can check your troop’s first aid kit against this list to see if anything should be added. Remember to replace your first aid kit’s contents every few years, as most first aid supplies expire.

Describe the early signs and symptoms of each of the following and explain what actions you should take:
6a) Shock

Shock is your biological response to trauma and results in the weakening of blood flow throughout the body. This reaction can be caused by a variety of factors such as severe injury, dehydration, heart failure, allergic reaction, and blood loss.

A person who is in shock will often have clammy skin, cold sweats, and paleness of skin. They will likely have difficulty taking full breaths and may faint unexpectedly.

When treating shock, try to calm the victim. Have them lie down, and cover them with a blanket. If you notice that their head or feet are pale, elevate the area opposite of where they are low on blood. An easy way to remember this is that if the face is pale, raise the tail, and vice versa. Keep talking to the victim to reassure them, and note down any details around the emergency which could be useful to medical personnel.

6b) Heart attack

Some of the early signs of a heart attack can be severe chest pressure, left arm pain, jaw pain, profuse sweating, gray skin coloring, nausea, difficulty breathing, or a feeling of weakness. You will be learning much more about heart attacks, as well to respond to them, in your upcoming CPR course. 

Without knowledge of CPR, you should immediately place the victim in a seated position with their knees raised and instruct someone nearby to call 911. An AED should also be used in the case of a halted pulse.

Here is a quick and informative video (2:00) on the differences between a cardiac arrest and a heart attack, as these two are often confused:

This video provides a great explanation but is from the UK.Call 911 in a medical emergency.

(This video provides a great explanation but is from the UK.Call 911 in a medical emergency.)

6c) Stroke

Strokes are caused by an interruption of blood flow supplied to the brain. Symptoms of a stroke can be recalled by the simple acronym, FAST:

  • Face drooping
  • Arm weakness
  • Speech difficulty
  • Time to call 9-1-1

While waiting for an ambulance, speak to the victim in a calm and reassuring manner. You can warm them with a blanket as well. However, do not provide them with food or water, as this can cause greater complications after the stroke’s onset. If they fall unconscious and are not breathing, be ready to perform CPR. 

Do the following:
7a) Describe the conditions that must exist before performing CPR on a person. Then demonstrate proper CPR technique using a training device approved by your counselor.

While performing chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), you run the risk of using the technique ineffectively and further injuring your victim. Therefore, to gain an understanding of proper CPR technique, you should first complete the CPR certification program before trying to perform this on another person.

Under no circumstances should you perform CPR unless the following conditions occur: 

  • The victim must be unresponsive (Ask, “are you okay?”)
  • They must not be breathing (Ear over their mouth, propping chin up, to check for breathing

(Important note as of 2020: The American Heart Association (AHA) now recommends that as soon as you see an emergency, immediately call for help. If, after checking with the victim (asking are you okay and feeling for air coming out of their lungs), they still appear non-responsive and unbreathing, begin CPR. The AHA recommends the following:

  • Compressions – 30 compressions at 2 inches deep, 100 per minute.
  • If the rescuer is trained in CPR, they should give 2 rescue breaths, otherwise, continue with compressions
  • Rescue breaths begin by tilting the victim’s head back and lifting the chin slightly to open the airway, then pinching the nostrils closed and giving 2 normal breaths, watching the victim’s chest rise and fall.
  • Continuing the cycle of continued compressions or 30 compressions and two rescue breaths.)

Watch the following video (1:56) for a quick visual walkthrough on adult CPR:

7b) Explain the use of an automated external defibrillator (AED). Identify the location of the AED at your school, place of worship, and troop meeting place, if one is present.

An automated external defibrillator, or AED, is used to save lives during sudden cardiac arrest. Most AEDs are equipped with audio or visual instructions for use but all AEDs generally work in the same way. The instructions are as follows:

  1. Turn on the AED and follow the prompts.
  2. Expose the victim’s bare chest, wiping it dry to later attach the AED patches.
  3. Attach the AED pads to the victim, plugging them into the connector if necessary.
  4. Making sure that no one is in contact with the victim, tell everyone to stand clear and press the ‘analyze’ button (this checks for heart rhythm).
  5. If the AED recommends resuscitation, ensure that no one is touching the person by saying “stand clear.” Once clear, press the “shock” button.
  6. Begin CPR after delivering the shock. If no shock is advised, begin CPR. Perform CPR while following the AED’s prompts. If they begin to breathe and show obvious signs of life, discontinue CPR and monitor for changes in condition.
Do the following:
8a) Show the steps that need to be taken for someone who has a large open wound or cut that is not bleeding.

To lower the risk of transmitting infections, if possible, wash your hands before coming into contact with any open wounds. and wear gloves After administering emergency first-aid for any sort of wound or cut which may require stitches, always seek the assistance of trained medical personnel.

If a large wound or cut does not require emergency medical attention, be sure to still clean the injury. Using hydrogen peroxide, disinfect the wound, then apply a bandage with antibacterial cream over the affected area. Monitor the wound and replace the bandage every few days. In the weeks following, look for signs of pus or redness around the injury, which may indicate possible infection.

8b) Show the steps that need to be taken for someone who has a large open wound or cut that is severely bleeding.

If someone is severely bleeding, your first priority is to limit their loss of blood. After having someone call for help, evaluate the victim using the triage method. If they’re conscious, breathing, and in an environment out of further risk, begin work to stop the bleeding. This can be done in 5 steps:

  1. Clean the wound: if possible, remove any dirt or debris from the wound to prevent infection. Do not pull out anything embedded in the wound as this could cause much more bleeding.
  2. Apply steady pressure to the wound: using a sterile cloth or bandage, press into the wound with a steady pressure to stop the bleeding. 
  3. Immobilize the wound: if blood soaks through the compress, do not remove it. Place another bandage over the first, and continue applying pressure. Eventually, the blood should clot and the bleeding should slow.
  4. Elevate the wound: by raising the wound above the level of the heart, gravity helps to halt the blood flow. Lay the victim down and have them raise the wound as high as possible. 
  5. Assist the victim until help arrives: once their wound has been treated, your task is to keep the victim as comfortable as possible until emergency medical personnel arrive. Ensure that they are not too hot or too cold, and talk to them to keep them calm.
8c) Tell the dangers in the use of a tourniquet and the conditions under which its use is justified.

A tourniquet should only be used on heavy bleeding as a last resort. Tourniquets are tight wrappings, 2-4 inches above a wound, which restrict blood flow and effectively stop uncontrollable and potentially deadly bleeding. However, tourniquets can cause permanent damage so only use this method when prepared to sacrifice a limb in order to save a life.

The following video (2:00) walks you through how to create a makeshift tourniquet.

This video walks you through how to create a makeshift tourniquet. Keep in mind that using a tourniquet is dangerous, and will likely result in the loss of a limb.

(Keep in mind that using a tourniquet is dangerous, and will likely result in the loss of a limb.)

A tourniquet should only be used on a victim is bleeding at an uncontrollable rate from one of their appendages. For instance, if someone were to lose their finger or have their arm crushed, and were in danger of bleeding out, using a tourniquet may be the appropriate response.

9. Explain when a bee sting could be life-threatening and what action should be taken for prevention and for first aid.

In individuals with severe allergies to bee venom, just one sting could result in a fatal reaction called anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic reactions cause immediate and severe swelling in the neck and face, as well as difficulty breathing, and can prove fatal if left untreated.

Most people with severe allergies carry an EpiPen. When used by removing the safety cap and pressing the needle into the victim’s thigh, an EpiPen can counteract an anaphylactic reaction. However, the effect of an EpiPen is temporary and the person must still quickly receive medical attention.

Describe the signs and symptoms and demonstrate the proper procedures for handling and immobilizing suspected closed and open fractures or dislocations of the:
10a) Forearm, 10b) Wrist, 10c) Upper leg, 10d) Lower leg, 10e) Ankle

A fracture is any sort of broken bone. To provide medical treatment, stop any bleeding and immobilize the injury. Do not attempt to straighten the break and gently apply a splint to the affected area by taking two rigid pieces of material and sandwiching the fracture on either side.

Securely fasten the splint by tying both rigid pieces of material together at the tops and bottoms, below and above the fracture. Apply a cold compress to reduce swelling and seek medical attention as soon as possible.

A dislocation occurs when the ends of your bones are forced out of their normal position. Dislocations are treated in a way almost identical to how you would treat fractures. Immobilize the injury and seek medical help. Do not attempt to pop the joint back into place as this could cause further damage. In both cases, be sure not to put further pressure on the injury.

Here’s a great article on splinting with informative visuals.

11) Describe the signs, symptoms, and possible complications and demonstrate care for someone with a suspected injury to the head, neck, or back.

A head, neck, or back injury can result in damage to the brain and spinal cord. These types of injuries can be life-threatening to the victim and are impossible to treat in the field.

To keep the injury from becoming worse, make sure the victim remains absolutely still with their neck and back immobilized. If needed, hold their head in place in a slightly inclined or neutral position. Do not move the victim unless they are in immediate danger.

To identify this type of injury, look for signs of swelling and broken bones in the head or spine. If the victim is conscious, examine them for signs of confusion, inability to remember basic facts, lightheadedness, slurred speech, or uneven people dilation. If they exhibit any of these symptoms or have fallen from a height above their own head, assume that a head, neck or back injury has occurred.

Describe the symptoms, proper first-aid procedures, and possible prevention measures for the following conditions:
12a) Anaphylaxis/allergic reactions

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that requires immediate treatment. By using epinephrine (an adrenaline shot), the symptoms of anaphylaxis can be reversed.

Signs of anaphylactic reaction appear as typical allergy symptoms such as a runny nose or rash. This can also be accompanied by coughing, difficulty breathing, weak pulse, or a sense of doom. Anaphylactic reactions require medical followup, even after epinephrine is administered.

12b) Bruises

Bruises, or contusions, appear as dark welts on the surface of one’s skin and are caused by damage to underlying blood vessels. A bruise may feel tender in the first few days, however, because the skin is not broken there is no risk of infection. Applying a cold compress to the bruise immediately after damage may reduce swelling and discoloration.

12c) Sprains or strains

A strain is an overextension of a muscle or tendon, whereas a sprain is caused by motion which tears the tissues around a joint. In both cases, a cold compress should be applied to reduce swelling.

To treat strains or sprains, immobilize the injury and stay off of it for a few days. Both of these issues should not be too severe. However, if in a week the injury is still giving you problems consider seeing a doctor.

12d) Hypothermia

Hypothermia is caused by one’s core body temperature falling below 95°F. While symptoms of mild hypothermia include shivering and confusion, in more dangerous cases the victim will not have enough energy to continue shivering and may fall unconscious.

If you notice someone is experiencing hypothermia, immediately warm them using extra clothing, fire, or through body heat. Do not suddenly re-warm the victim by placing them in a hot shower, as this could lead to rewarming shock.

12e) Frostbite

Frostbite occurs when extremities, such as fingers and toes, begin to freeze. Skin in the affected areas will turn blue, then white. If you notice frostbite setting in, evacuate to a warm area. Try not to wrap the affected area in anything, as this could cause some of the tissue to be killed off.

A better way to warm a frostbitten area is by running it under cool water, then, slowly increasing the water temperature as the injury defrosts.

12f) Burns—first, second, and third degree

Although heat is the most common type of burn, damage to bodily tissues caused by chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation are also considered types of burns. There are 3 primary categories of burns:

  • First Degree: A sunburn would be a type of first-degree burn. The affected area will appear red and sensitive to touch.
  • Second Degree: Second degree burns are deeper and more painful than first degree. Alongside redness and inflammation, the skin of a second degree burn would also be blistered.
  • Third Degree: Third-degree burns involve all layers of skin. There will be major damage to nerves and blood vessels, causing the skin to appear white and leathery.

For minor burns, taking up relatively little space on the body, treatment should be done by cooling the affected area. Apply a wet compress until the pain subsides. Afterward, bandage the burn with sterile gauze, wrapping loosely so as not to put pressure on the injured skin.

For second-degree burns, taking up more than 4 inches of space, or third-degree burns, one should seek emergency medical care. Protect the burned person from further harm, and make sure that they are breathing. Cover the area of the burn with a cool, moist bandage, but never immerse a severe burn in water. Elevate the burned area and watch for signs of shock as you await an emergency medical response.

12g) Convulsions/seizures

Convulsions are involuntary muscle spasms that occur as a common symptom of seizures. These can appear as brief blackouts, drooling, loss of bowel control, or sudden shaking of the entire body. The cause of both convulsions and seizures are abnormal electrical activity in the brain. However, the specific triggers are often unclear.

It is important not to hold the victim down or restrain them in any way. Call for emergency medical services and remove anything harmful that the victim, while flailing around, could collide with. Allow for the convulsions to cease naturally, ensuring that the victim does not choke or harm themselves while on the ground. 

12h) Dehydration

Dehydration occurs when the body does not consume enough water. Some symptoms of dehydration include a flushed face, lack of sweat, or feeling of weakness. This is a potentially fatal condition that can result in lowered blood pressure, dizziness, and fainting.

To treat dehydration, encourage the victim to rest and replenish their body with water and electrolytes. Hydrate the victim slowly to avoid water intoxication and electrolyte imbalance.

12i) Muscle cramps

Cramps are caused by sudden, involuntary contractions in a muscle. While these spasms tend to subside in a matter of minutes, they can cause significant pain and impairment. Exercise extreme caution if you are swimming and are stricken by a cramp, as the pain may cause you to panic and possibly drown.

Muscle cramps are usually caused by a lack of water and electrolytes. By taking deep breaths and gently massaging the cramped area, you can reduce some of the pain.

12j) Heat exhaustion

There are two main types of heat exhaustion

  • Water depletion: Characterized by thirst, headache, a feeling of weakness, and loss of consciousness.
  • Sodium depletion: characterized by vomiting, muscle cramps, and dizziness.

Heat exhaustion can progress into heat stroke, and should not be taken lightly. If you suspect that someone is suffering from heat exhaustion, immediately get them into a cool area to rest. Have them drink plenty of fluids and take a cool shower. They may be sensitive to high temperatures for a few days afterward.

12k) Heatstroke

Heatstroke is caused when one’s body temperature exceeds 104°F. If untreated, heatstroke can lead to seizures, confusion, loss of consciousness and even a coma. Common symptoms of a heat stroke are throbbing headaches, dizziness, a lack of sweating despite warm weather, or a feeling of weakness. 

If you suspect someone of having heatstroke, immediately call 911. Sit them down in a cool, shady area, and try to lower their body temperature. To prevent heat exhaustion and heatstroke, stay hydrated, wear sun protection and refrain from strenuous activity at the warmest time of day.

12l) Abdominal pain

Mild pain in the abdomen can result from many different causes and is typically not a reason to worry. Most cases are indigestion, constipation, overeating, or a stomach virus. These can be handled by taking an antacid and waiting for around a day. However, if your abdominal pain is severe, continual, or returning, you should contact your doctor.

12m) Broken, chipped, or loosened tooth

If you chip, break or loosen a tooth, be sure to exercise caution not to choke on broken tooth fragments. Clean the area and apply a cold compress which will reduce swelling. Go to the dentist as soon as possible, bringing with you any tooth fragments which may have been dislodged.

Do the following:
13a) Describe the conditions under which an injured person should be moved.

As motion can cause further pain and injuries, you should only move an injured person when absolutely necessary.

The American Red Cross recommends taking this risk when:

  • They or you are faced with an immediate danger such as a fire or collapsing structure.
  • You need to get to another person requiring more urgent medical care.
  • When necessary to give proper care. For example, CPR must be done on a flat surface so in that case moving the victim would be appropriate.
13b) If a sick or injured person must be moved, tell how you would determine the best method. Demonstrate this method.
13c) With helpers under your supervision, improvise a stretcher and move a presumably unconscious person.

For a great visual guide on moving an injured person and improvising a stretcher, check out the website by Troop 50 HERE. The best method of transporting an injured person is by using any effective way which does not further injure them. In groups, improvising a stretcher is also an effective way of transporting an injured person. 

14) Teach another Scout a first-aid skill selected by your counselor.

Now that you’ve completed this guide to the first aid merit badge, you’re ready to teach any of the skills you just learned to your fellow scouts! The best way to learn first aid is through practice. Rehearse with your troop how you would handle a medical emergency so that you’re prepared for the real thing. Congratulations on reading all the way through!

Conclusion

Now that you’ve learned a ton of useful first aid techniques and information, practice these skills often! You’ll never know when they’ll be needed. By preparing yourself with knowledge of how to handle any first aid emergency, you’re more able to enjoy the activities you do in Scouting. 🙂

If you liked this article, I’d also recommend checking out my guide to the Emergency Preparedness merit badge. First aid training allows you to be a person that your troop and community can depend on when disaster strikes, and emergency preparedness is no different!

I hope you’ve found my guide helpful, and encourage you to check out some of my other merit badge resources. Share this with your fellow scouts, and use it as a reference if you ever need a refresher on your first aid skills. I hope this has helped you gain a bit of ScoutSmarts, and wish you the best of luck on your Scouting journey!

Cole

I'm constantly writing new content for this website because I believe in Scouts like you! Thanks so much for reading, and for making this world a better place. Until next time, I'm wishing you all the best on your journey to Eagle and beyond!

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