Second Class Rank Requirement Answers: A Scout’s Guide


For scouts preparing to rank up to Second Class, you’re in the right place! In this guide, I’ll be providing you with all of the info that you’ll need to answer each of the BSA’s Second Class rank requirements. Along the way, you’ll learn foundational Scouting skills and gain confidence!

You’ve reached part 2 of my ultimate guide to the BSA Second Class rank! If you’re new to ScoutSmarts, you should first check out part 1 for the answers to requirements 1-5 of the Second Class rank.

If you’ve just come over from part one, congratulations! You’re halfway done. Once you finish this rank guide, you’ll be equipped with the knowledge needed to start stepping up as a troop leader and teaching these skills to others. Also, great job making it this far! 😉

Enough said, let’s get back into it! First, take a minute to closely review and think through requirements 6-12 of the Second Class rank. Then, it’ll be time to start learning…

What Are the Second Class Rank Requirement Answers?

  1. FIRST AID
    • –6a. Demonstrate first aid for the following:
      • –Object in the eye
      • –Bite of a warm blooded animal
      • –Puncture wounds from a splinter, nail, and fishhook
      • –Serious burns (partial thickness, or second degree)
      • –Heat exhaustion
      • –Shock
      • –Heatstroke, dehydration, hypothermia, and hyperventilation
    • –6b. Show what to do for “hurry” cases of stopped breathing, stroke, severe bleeding, and ingested poisoning.
    • –6c. Tell what you can do while on a campout or hike to prevent or reduce the occurrence of the injuries listed in Second Class requirements 6a and 6b.
    • –6d. Explain what to do in case of accidents that require emergency response in the home and the backcountry. Explain what constitutes an emergency and what information you will need to provide to a responder.
    • –6e. Tell how you should respond if you come upon the scene of a vehicular accident.
  2. FITNESS
    • –7a. After competing Tenderfoot requirement 6c, be physically active at least 30 minutes a day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.
    • –7b. Share your challenges and successes in completing Second Class requirement 7a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life and develop a plan for doing so.
    • –7c. Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family, and explain the dangers of substance addictions. Report to your Scoutmaster or other adult leader in your troop about which parts of the Scout Oath and Law relate to what you learned.
  3. CITIZENSHIP
    • –8a. Participate in a flag ceremony for your school, religious institution, chartered organization, community, or Scouting activity.
    • –8b. Explain what respect is due the flag of the United States.
    • –8c. With your parents or guardian, decide on an amount of money that you would like to earn, based on the cost of a specific item you would like to purchase. Develop a written plan to earn the amount agreed upon and follow that plan; it is acceptable to make changes to your plan along the way. Discuss any changes made to your original plan and whether you met your goal.
    • –8d. At a minimum of three locations, compare the cost of the item for which you are saving to determine the best place to purchase it. After completing Second Class requirement 8c, decide if you will use the amount that you earned as originally intended, save all or part of it, or use it for another purpose.
    • –8e. Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath.
  4. LEADERSHIP
    • –9a. Explain the three R’s of personal safety and protection.
    • –9b. Describe bullying; tell what the appropriate response is to someone who is bullying you or another person.
  5. SCOUT SPIRIT
    • 10. Demonstrate scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (not to include those used for Tenderfoot requirement 9) in your everyday life.
  6. While working toward the Second Class rank, and after completing Tenderfoot requirement 10, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
  7. Successfully complete your board of review for the Second Class rank.

Requirements 6a-6e: First Aid

First aid is one of the most important skills you’ll ever learn as a scout. With BSA first aid knowledge, you’ll be able to help others on the fly and confidently handle almost any type of medical emergency — which could potentially save a life! 🙂

In this section, we’ll go over some basic first aid skills that might come in handy in both Scouting and your everyday life. Also, if you haven’t yet earned your First Aid merit badge, you should definitely start your blue card now because there’s quite a bit of overlap!

6a) Demonstrate first aid for the following:
Object in the eye
–Bite of a warm blooded animal
–Puncture wounds from a splinter, nail, and fishhook
–Serious burns (partial thickness, or second degree)
–Heat exhaustion
–Shock
–Heatstroke, dehydration, hypothermia, and hyperventilation

Listed below are vital first aid scenarios that you’ll need to know how to handle. I’ll be giving you a quick rundown of each one, along with some tips. The most important thing to remember is to seek professional help if at any point the medical situation goes beyond the scope of your training.

Object In The Eye

First things first, make sure to wear appropriate eye protection. When it comes to safety, prevention is key! However, accidents can happen so below are some basic steps to take in the event that you or someone you know gets an object stuck in their eye.

For treating small particle(s) in the eye:

  1. Don’t rub the eye since rubbing can cause the object to scratch and irritate the eye further.
  2. Rinse the affected eye out with clean, cool water and try to flush out the object. Blinking while facing downward should help.
  3. If you’ve done all of the steps above but still need more help, seek professional medical attention. Don’t try to force out an object, as doing so may cause additional harm.

For more info on how to treat various eye injuries, such as hits, burns, or punctures, I’d encourage you to check out the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s website. Permanent blindness can result from severe damage to the eye, so make sure to react quickly and avoid causing further harm.

Bite Of A Warm-Blooded Animal

Animal bites can be dangerous, as they may cause severe bleeding, infection, and disease. The good news is that bites from wild animals are rare! 🙂 Nonetheless, you should try to limit the chances of encountering a wild animal on your outings by sticking to well-known trails and areas.

Now, let’s say you’ve taken all the necessary precautions but somehow still get bitten by an animal. In that case, you’ll need to determine whether the bite is minor or serious and follow the steps below.

For treating a minor animal bite:

  1. Clean the wound with soap and warm water.
  2. Using a clean bandage or towel, apply pressure to stop any bleeding.
  3. Apply an antibiotic ointment to the affected area.
  4. Cover the injury with a bandage.
  5. Monitor for any signs of infection.

For a severe animal bite, get the victim out of immediate harm, and apply pressure to the wound if it’s bleeding heavily. Deep wounds will almost certainly get infected if not treated by professionals so, after stemming the flow of blood, head to a hospital ASAP!

Puncture Wounds From A Splinter, Nail, And Fishhook

Up next are puncture wounds. Puncture wounds can be caused by a variety of sharp objects and need to be treated carefully to avoid further damage. As you’ll see, the steps for treating a puncture wound and an animal bite are very similar.

For most medium-sized puncture wounds (like being poked by a nail or stake):

  1. Press a clean bandage or towel to the area to stop any bleeding.
  2. Clean the wound with water.
  3. Apply an antibiotic ointment to the affected area.
  4. Bandage the wound.
  5. If the wound does not improve or you notice signs of infection, seek medical attention.

If something large is embedded deep in the wound, leave it in and call for medical help immediately. The embedded object often prevents the victim from bleeding out. If you’ve been punctured by something dirty or rusty, you should also see a doctor, as rust can cause bacterial tetanus infections.

Splinters

Large splinters that are bleeding profusely should be treated in the same way as medium-sized puncture wounds. By removing it and cleaning the area thoroughly. In my experience, the best way to treat small splinters comes in 2 easy steps:

  1. Try to remove the splinter with tweezers. However, if it’s in there deep beneath layers of skin, go to step 2!
  2. Place a bandaid covered in ointment over the splinter. Swap out every 1-2 days for about a week.
    • After some time passes, the skin should be white and wrinkly. This will make it very easy to remove the splinter with tweezers.
    • Heck, I’ve even had splinters come out on their own by using this method! 🙂
Fishhooks

The most common method for treating a fishhook puncture is to push it through the skin and then cut the barb off. However, after further research, it seems as though there’s a better (less painful) method! Watch the video (3:01) below for a genius demonstration of this technique:

Serious Burns (Partial Thickness, Or Second Degree)

Second-degree burns (aka partial thickness burns) are characterized by blisters, redness, swelling. Ouch! They can be caused by anything from hot water and open flames to sun exposure and chemical contact.

When it comes to minor second-degree burns, you’ll want to hold the burned area under cool, running water for a few minutes. Do not use ice or ice water. You can also apply some aloe vera to help soothe the pain. For any burns that cover a large area, seek a medical professional.

Heat Exhaustion

Heat exhaustion occurs when the body is exposed to high temperatures and overheats. It’s important to treat heat exhaustion right away because it can lead to heatstroke, a condition that is potentially life-threatening. Below are a few common signs of heat exhaustion:

  • Excessive sweating
  • Confusion
  • Headache
  • Dizziness/fainting
  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Fast pulse

If you notice someone showing symptoms, act immediately. First, have them rest in a cool (or at least shaded) place. Then, give them water or electrolyte drinks to prevent dehydration. Lastly, try to cool them off with air conditioning, a fan, and/or wet towels.

If heatstroke is suspected or symptoms worsen, get emergency help right away.

Shock

When you hear the word “shock,” you probably think of something along the lines of surprise. For our purposes though, we’re going to look at a different definition — you know, the one they use on those medical TV shows when an ambulance is rushing some character to the hospital.

In simple terms, shock is the body not getting enough blood flow. This condition can be caused by blood loss, trauma, and a myriad of other things. The list of symptoms is also just as long.

The most important thing to remember is that shock is potentially fatal so you must seek medical attention immediately.

If someone appears to be in shock, call 911 and provide first aid until help arrives. You’ll want to lay the person on their back and elevate their feet. If you suspect that they’re injured, avoid moving them. Check their breathing and pulse regularly. If they’re showing no signs of life, begin CPR.

Heatstroke, Dehydration, Hypothermia, and Hyperventilation

There are a few more potentially life-threatening conditions that you should become familiar with. For a quick overview, take a look at the chart below. By learning the appropriate steps to take now, you’ll know exactly what to do if you ever find yourself in one of these situations!

DefinitionCausesSymptomsFirst Aid
HeatstrokeCore body temperature >104℉High temperaturesRapid breathing, fast heart rate, flushing, no sweating, loss of consciousness, seizuresImmerse the victim in cool water or use ice packs ASAP and call 911.
DehydrationBody doesn’t have enough waterDrinking too little/losing too much waterThirst, dry or sticky mouth, dark urine, headacheDrink water and/or electrolyte drinks.
HypothermiaCore body temperature <95℉Cold weather, cold waterShivering, slow breathing, weak pulse, loss of consciousnessGently move the victim out of the cold. Gradually rewarm with dry clothes, blankets, and warm beverages.
HyperventilationExcessively rapid or deep breathingAnxiety, panicFast heart rate, lightheadedness, chest pain, yawning or sighing, numbnessBreathe through pursed lips. Breathe into a paper bag or cupped hands.
6b) Show what to do for “hurry” cases of stopped breathing, stroke, severe bleeding, and ingested poisoning.

“Hurry” cases are exactly what they sound like — first aid cases where your response time could mean the difference between life and death. There are a few specific “hurry” cases that the BSA wants you to know, and we’ll go over each of them individually.

Stopped Breathing

What happens each time we take a breath? We inhale oxygen. When someone stops breathing, the oxygen supply to the brain and other organs is cut off, and that person can die quickly. If you see someone who doesn’t appear to be breathing, you’ll need to act immediately.

First, check if the person is responsive by calling and shaking them. If they are not responding, have someone dial 911 while you start rescue breathing. Here’s a great video demonstration (2:52) of all the steps you should take:

Keep providing rescue breaths until EMTs take over. Remember that this procedure applies to anyone who stops breathing but still has a pulse. If you find yourself in a situation where someone isn’t breathing AND has no pulse, begin CPR.

Make sure you become very familiar with these steps. This is all stuff you’ll need to know for the First Aid and Lifesaving merit badges. Hopefully, you’ll never be faced with this situation, but part of being a scout means being prepared!

Stroke

We hear about strokes all the time, but what exactly are they? Simply put, a stroke is when part of the brain loses blood supply. This can lead to permanent brain damage and even death, so it’s critical that treatment isn’t delayed.

When it comes to strokes, the most valuable thing you can do is be able to spot one immediately and act FAST. We’ll first go over some telltale signs of a stroke and then talk about steps to take.

Did you know that stroke is the 5th leading cause of death in the United States? 🙁 You’ll want to remember the acronym “BE FAST” to help identify stroke symptoms:

B = Balance (loss of balance)

E = Eyes (blurred vision or vision loss)

F = Face (facial droop on one side)

A = Arms (one arm drifts downward when asked to raise both arms)

S = Speech (slurred speech)

T = Time (time to call 911)

If you notice any of these signs, call 911 immediately. Have the person lie on their side with their head slightly elevated and don’t give them any medications. Make a note of the time when you first noticed symptoms. Stay calm, keep the person awake, and wait for medical personnel.

Severe Bleeding

Severe bleeding is very dangerous– too much blood loss can quickly lead to shock and eventual death. Fortunately, in most cases severe bleeding is easily identifiable, which will allow you to act more quickly. Remember, your number one priority is to stop the bleeding!

For severe bleeding, have someone call 911 while you firmly wrap a bandage around the wound or use a clean cloth to apply pressure. If the bandages are soaked through, just add another bandage over them and continue to apply pressure. Removing a bandage could break clots and make things worse.

If the bleeding still won’t stop and there’s no other option, use a tourniquet.

Ingested Poison

If someone is vomiting, confused, having difficulty breathing, or smells like chemicals, they may have ingested poison. If you suspect poisoning, call Poison Control (800-222-1222) immediately and follow their instructions. Here’s some MayoClinic info for different types of poisoning.

While you’re waiting on emergency services, there are a few additional things you should do. Carefully remove any remaining poison on the person. If you know what they ingested, try to see if there are any instructions on what to do in the case of accidental poisoning.

6c) Tell what you can do while on a campout or hike to prevent or reduce the occurrence of the injuries listed in Second Class requirements 6a and 6b.

Most of the injuries we’ve talked about so far are pretty easily avoidable on outings. Here’s a brief review of all the different injuries along with some prevention tips. As you’ll see, you should be all set with a bit of caution and common sense. 😛

Object in the eyeIf you’re going to participate in an activity where you might get an object in your eye, wear eye protection.
Bite of a warm-blooded animalStick to well-known paths and areas. Properly storing food and trash can also help. If you see a wild animal, don’t provoke it.
Puncture woundsBe careful of what’s around you. Follow Totin’ Chip rules. Make sure that any sharp objects are accounted for at all times.
Serious burnsThis one’s pretty easy. Be careful around anything that may be hot like fires, stoves, and hot liquids.
Heat exhaustionWhen doing physical activity in a high-temperature environment, take breaks in the shade or cooler areas and stay hydrated.
ShockThe best thing you can do is be aware of your surroundings and avoid any injuries that may lead to shock.
Heatstroke, dehydration, hypothermia, and hyperventilationMake plans with the weather in mind. No matter the type of outing, be prepared. Dress accordingly, take breaks, and stay hydrated.
Stopped breathingStopped breathing often happens unexpectedly. Just be ready to give first aid if someone does stop breathing.
StrokeThere’s not much you can do to prevent a stroke other than lead a healthy life and encourage others to do the same.
Severe BleedingBe cognizant of your environment and stick to the planned trail. Be aware of any sharp objects.
Ingested PoisonKeep potential poisons (cleaners, medications, etc.) out of reach and sight of children. Don’t store anything poisonous anywhere near food.

Something else you could do to be prepared for any outing is to bring a first aid kit. I’d recommend checking out this Monoki Survival First Aid Kit on Amazon. It’s very compact and contains any first aid tool you could possibly need!

6d) Explain what to do in case of accidents that require emergency response in the home and the backcountry. Explain what constitutes an emergency and what information you will need to provide to a responder.

Emergency Response In The Home

Calling 911 is the simplest and most effective way to reach emergency medical services from home and outdoor locations with cell reception. When speaking with a 911 dispatcher, immediately inform them of 4 things:

  1. The emergency: Use as much detail as possible to quickly describe the emergency. Instead of saying “my friend is unconscious” say, “My friend fell off a 6 ft ledge and hit his head. He’s breathing and not bleeding, but is currently unconscious, and has been for the last 3 minutes.”
  2. What’s currently happening: Is anyone performing CPR or taking first-aid measures? Quickly tell the dispatcher how the situation is being handled.
  3. Your location: Be as precise as possible when describing your location. Instead of saying an address or a school’s name, say, “I’m by the bleachers next to the football field of x school.” Send someone to meet with and guide the responders to you, if possible.
  4. Your phone number: EMS may need to call you back if they are unable to find you. In case your call disconnects, make sure to give the dispatcher the phone number that you’re currently calling from.

Stay on the line until help arrives and be sure not to leave the victim unattended. If phones are unavailable, seek help from a neighbor. You do this by shouting, if possible, so as not to leave the victim alone.

Emergency Response In The Backcountry

Before embarking on any wilderness outing, be sure to inform a trusted adult of your plans. Tell them the trip’s location and expected duration so that in an emergency situation they will be able to contact and dispatch rescue services to you. 

Oftentimes, you will be able to contact emergency personnel by cell phone. However, if you are unable to do so but are relatively close to civilization, you should send people back in vehicles who will call for help from the nearest phone.

If lost, do not leave your vehicle or campground. Larger objects are more likely to be found by rescue personnel. Controlled signal fires should only be used as a last resort. Do not, in any situation, start a forest fire.

To truly be prepared to camp safely though, I’d highly recommend checking out my Ultimate Guide To The Camping Merit Badge!

6e) Tell how you should respond if you come upon the scene of a vehicular accident.

The final first aid topic you’ll need to familiarize yourself with for your Second Class rank is vehicular accidents. Depending on the severity of an accident, the victim(s) can have a variety of injuries, ranging from minor to life-threatening.

Here’s a list of steps to take if you witness a motor vehicle accident. The most important thing to remember, however, is to provide emergency first aid but leave the more intensive care to the professionals.

  1. Check your Surroundings
    • Before you potentially put yourself in danger by responding to an accident, check if your surroundings are clear. If possible, send someone 50-100 yards up road to put down cones or flares so that other drivers are warned and slow down.
  2. Call 911
    • No matter how much help you’re able to provide, you still need to call emergency services. Police, EMS, and firefighters are necessary at most accidents due to the serious nature of these situations.
  3. Quickly Assess the Situation
    • How many people are involved in this crash? What’s the severity of the damage? Are there any bystanders who saw this happen or can help? These are all questions you should ask yourself when you arrive on the scene. Police will likely ask you what you saw to better assess what happened.
  4. Check the Victims
    • Are any victims unconscious? Check breathing and pulse. If they’re not breathing but have a pulse, start rescue breathing. If they’re neither breathing nor have a pulse, start CPR until EMS tells you to stop. Also, be mindful of any possible spinal injuries or severe bleeding.

Requirement 7a-7c: Health

7a) After competing Tenderfoot requirement 6c, be physically active at least 30 minutes a day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.

An important part of the Scout Oath is leading an active lifestyle. You’ll be embodying this principle by spending at least 30 minutes daily on physical activity, five days a week, for four weeks. This requirement is pretty straightforward, but you’ll need to stay on top of things.

Before you get started, I’d highly recommend joining a school sport if that’s possible. I personally did track, cross country, and canoe paddling! This will not only make getting physical activity easy, it’ll also be a great team experience and help you to make new friends!!

To learn about why it’s so important you start building a habit of exercising while you’re still young, watch this awesome video (3:10) outlining the many benefits of regular exercise:

The exercises you do are entirely up to you! You can choose anything from pushups and crunches to hiking and sports. Here’s a quick list of different types of exercises you can do:

Aerobic Fitness

  • Running: Jog for one or more miles at a steady pace. Try your best not to start walking.
  • Swimming: Swim for 15-30 minutes, making sure to exercise proper form and breathe deeply.
  • Jumping rope: Jump rope for 10 minutes.
  • Sprints: Sprint distances between 200 and 800 meters to train your aerobic intensity.

Muscular Strength/Endurance

  • Push-ups
  • Sit-ups
  • Pull-ups
  • Squats
  • Bicep curls
  • Burpees
  • Weight lifting (Make sure to get supervision and use proper form)

Also, be sure to log the dates, activities, and time spent on each in a journal or sheet of paper. Then, you should be good to go. Afterward, you can discuss your exercises with your Scoutmaster and get this requirement checked off! 😀

7b) Share your challenges and successes in completing Second Class requirement 7a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life and develop a plan for doing so.

No matter how physically fit you are, there are going to be some exercises that you find challenging. Reflect on which activities you excel at and which ones you’ve struggled with. Then, come up with a plan on how you can stay active doing your favorite activities after you’ve finished this requirement.

While working on Second Class requirement 7, you might notice that sticking to fitness goals can be difficult. Use this opportunity to get creative with ways to incorporate daily physical activity. For example, if you like to play video games, try doing 10 pushups every time you die in the game you’re playing!

7c) Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family, and explain the dangers of substance addictions. Report to your Scoutmaster or other adult leader in your troop about which parts of the Scout Oath and Law relate to what you learned.

Drug and substance abuse is a huge problem in today’s world. Even legal drugs such as nicotine and alcohol pose risks to your health. According to the National Institutes of Health, drug-related deaths have more than tripled since the year 2000.

The good news? These outcomes are entirely preventable. Many schools include drug education in their health curriculums or host events during school. If your school doesn’t offer this, see if other schools or community centers in your area do. Attend whichever event best fits your schedule!

After participating in a drug education event, discuss with your family and Scoutmaster what you’ve learned and how it relates to the Scout Oath and Law. To help get your creative juices flowing, I’ve listed some common dangers of drug use below:

  • Financial Problems
    • Addiction is not cheap. Many people sell personal belongings or even steal to get their fix. Even legal drugs like alcohol and nicotine can be extremely expensive if made a habit.
  • Health Issues
    • No matter the drug, prolonged use can cause serious health issues. Over-the-counter drugs are still drugs, and using more than the recommended amount of any substance can be dangerous.
  • Relationship Tensions
    • Drug addiction hurts relationships with friends and family. Seeing a loved one struggle with addiction can be mentally, emotionally, and physically devastating and may lead to toxic dynamics.

Requirement 8: Citizenship

8a) Participate in a flag ceremony for your school, religious institution, chartered organization, community, or Scouting activity.

During your time as a scout, you’ll attend many flag ceremonies. Flag ceremonies are a way to show respect to our country and recognize the importance of citizenship and contribution. In my troop, we’d hold a flag ceremony on the first morning of every camp!

For this requirement, you’ll need to hold a proper flag ceremony. An easy way to go about this is to offer to help out as a color guard during an upcoming Scouting event. If you need some help understanding how to do this, check out my guide on how to hold a proper BSA flag ceremony.

8b) Explain what respect is due the flag of the United States.

The American flag should be handled with the utmost respect. Below is a section of my BSA Flag Ceremony guide that explains how to behave respectfully toward the US flag. I’d recommend reading the whole article though to be 100% prepared for your future flag ceremonies! 🙂

1. The American Flag Must Never Touch the Ground 

One of the most important things to keep in mind when handling the American Flag is to never let it touch the ground. As our flag symbolizes the hard work and sacrifices of our forefathers, it should be treated with the utmost care and respect.

“The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.”

(Source: US Flag Code)

The American flag you’re presenting should never be flown, if soiled, and should be cleaned periodically. It’s actually alright to have your flag washed or dry cleaned, given that the cleaning process is done respectfully. If the American Flag is dirtied to the point where it is unpresentable, it must be retired through proper procedures. 

2. Scouts and Audience Members Should Salute the American Flag

During a flag ceremony, the American Flag will be presented before the audience, typically after it’s been raised or before it is lowered. At this point, the scouts and audience are supposed to acknowledge or salute its presence as a sign of respect to our nation and those within it. Here’s how:

  • For Scouts: Those who are in Scouting will salute with a modified “two” (Scouting’s 3-fingered salute) that rests against their forehead and looks like a standard salute.
  • For Members of our Nation’s Armed Forces: Those who are in the military or are retired from the military will salute in the way they were taught. 
  • For Non-Scouts: Audience members who have no Scouting or military background will place their right hand across their chest, resting their open palm over their heart.

3. Utmost Respect and Reverence is Required Throughout the Flag Ceremony

The presentation of the colors is a brief but incredibly important part of any Scouting event or camp. Therefore, the scouts attending a flag ceremony should always take the event seriously and encourage the same from their peers. Here’s how you should be respectful toward our nation’s flag:

  • Silence should be maintained throughout the entire presentation, outside of reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. Any discussions can wait until afterward.
  • When placed on a stage or podium, the American flag should always be positioned to the speaker’s right side,
  • Humor or improvisation should be avoided during a proper flag ceremony. 
  • Any hats or other forms of headgear should be removed during a flag ceremony, especially while reciting the Pledge of Allegiance
  • When flying a flag at half-staff in the wake of a tragic event, be sure to raise it to its full height first, before lowering the flag to its halfway point. Also, raise the flag to its full point before lowering it.
  • Don’t fasten a flag or tie it back, always allow it to fly free.
  • Never fly a torn, tattered, or visibly dirty American flag.
8c) With your parents or guardian, decide on an amount of money that you would like to earn, based on the cost of a specific item you would like to purchase. Develop a written plan to earn the amount agreed upon and follow that plan; it is acceptable to make changes to your plan along the way. Discuss any changes made to your original plan and whether you met your goal.

We all want things. Maybe you’d like a new book, fishing reel, or video game. However, things can be pretty expensive and require saving up in order to afford them. In this requirement, we’ll be putting into practice the “Thrifty” point of Scout Law!

To start, find an item you want to purchase. Your next step will be figuring out how you’ll earn the money and the amount of time it’ll take you to do so. If you’re below legal working age, make sure to talk to your parents and try to come to an arrangement.

Around the time that I started Scouting, I started noticing that I needed more money to do things. Visiting movies with friends? Getting that new Pokemon game? Buying my favorite snack? All those expenses cost a lot more than I had!

Since I didn’t want to ask my parents for money each time I needed it, I decided to write out a chore contract. For keeping up chores like dishes, good grades, cleaning the bathroom, etc, I could get paid $15 each week! My parents agreed, and that was how I started saving money.

Once you’ve made a plan, it’s time to get to work! Your plan may change over time, and that’s OK. Keep working and saving to reach your goal. Also, remember to keep track of your goal so you can explain this requirement to your Scoutmaster or counselor!

To learn more about finances and saving, you should check out my guide to the Personal Management merit badge! Although this Eagle-required badge is best done as an older scout, learning a bit about personal finance now will surely help you down the road. 🙂

8d) At a minimum of three locations, compare the cost of the item for which you are saving to determine the best place to purchase it. After completing Second Class requirement 8c, decide if you will use the amount that you earned as originally intended, save all or part of it, or use it for another purpose.

This part is pretty easy thanks to online shopping! While Amazon is a go-to for many people, there are plenty of other online stores where you can compare prices. Find three stores, online or in-person, and compare prices. Then, decide which store you’ll go with.

Once you collect all the money needed, decide if you’re actually going to purchase the item. If you do and have money left over, explain what you’ll do with the remaining money. Are you going to save it, or will you purchase something else with it? I’d recommend saving!

If you choose not to spend the money, what will you do with it? No matter what you decide, write down your thought process so you can discuss this fun financial journey with your counselor. Also, I hope you enjoy your new purchase! 😀

8e) Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath.

There are plenty of places that could use some extra help! From either within or outside your troop, look for opportunities to volunteer and help out. Your only requirements are that the project is Scoutmaster-approved and lasts longer than 2 hours.

Once you’ve completed your approved service project, explain how it relates to the Scout Oath. For instance, many service projects are ways to “help other people at all times.” Do some critical thinking to come up with a few other examples. Then, discuss them with your counselor!

Requirement 9: Leadership

9a) Explain the three R’s of personal safety and protection.

The three R’s of personal safety and protection can help you identify situations where you or someone you know might be at risk of being molested. I know this can be an uncomfortable topic, but it’s another important form of safety you need to be aware of.

By following the three R’s, you can stop an abuser before something terrible happens to you or someone else. Here are the three R’s and how they can help you stay safe:

  • Recognize: Recognize situations that place you at risk of being molested, how child molesters operate, and that anyone could be a molester. Recognize when things feel creepy or wrong, and be ready to take action.
  • Resist: Resist any unwanted or inappropriate attention/touches from both strangers and people you know, alike. Make it very clear you’re uncomfortable with what’s going on, and do your best to leave the situation. Resistance will stop most attempts at molestation.
  • Report: Report any attempted or actual molestation to a parent or other trusted adult. This prevents further abuse and helps to protect other children. You will be in no way, shape, or form responsible for what occurred, and the perpetrator must be stopped.

In 99.9% of circumstances scouts are completely safe, but disgusting predators do exist out there. Remember that all Scouting volunteers must complete Youth Protection Training and are ready to have your back if this ever occurs. By knowing the three R’s of personal safety, you’ll be prepared to keep yourself and those around you protected.

9b) Describe bullying; tell what the appropriate response is to someone who is bullying you or another person.

Bullying is when someone directs aggressive behavior toward another person in order to harm or intimidate them. This could be name-calling, teasing, or even physical violence. If you or someone you know is being bullied, here are some things I’ve done and which you could consider doing:

  • For Teasing/Non-Violent Bulling: Tell the bully that what they’re doing isn’t cool and that they’re acting like a jerk.
    • Some bullies might just be unaware, so the best approach is just to let them know that they’re acting like a bully.
    • “Hey dude, cut it out. I thought you were a decent guy. I don’t know if you’re trying to be cool or whatever, but you’re being a real jerk to (person’s name). Is that what you want?”
  • For Violent Bullying: Let a Scoutmaster, teacher, or authority figure know what’s going on. Try to diffuse any fights and try to escape to a public area, if necessary.

Remember, bullying is something that can happen to anyone, even you. If you see someone getting bullied or you yourself are being bullied, report it to a trusted adult. For more tips on how to handle a bully, check out the website StopBullying.gov.

Requirement 10: Scout Spirit

10) Demonstrate scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (not to include those used for Tenderfoot requirement 9) in your everyday life.

By this point, the Scout Oath and Law are probably drilled into your head, but actions speak louder than words. It’s time to show you really know what these words mean! In your day-to-day life, how do you live by the Scout Oath and Law?

Take time to self-reflect. Which four Scout Law points did you live by, and what are some specific examples? Remember, you can’t use what you did for Tenderfoot for this requirement so think critically. Good luck scout, I know you can finish strong! 🙂

11) While working toward the Second Class rank, and after completing Tenderfoot requirement 10, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

Now that we’ve made it to the end, it’s time for your Scoutmaster conference. I know this can seem daunting, but I know you can do it! Explain to your Scoutmaster what you’ve learned while completing Second Class and how it has helped you become a better scout in the troop and in the community.

For your Second Class Scoutmaster conference, you’ll mainly be discussing your experiences with your patrol and in learning the basic Scouting skills. For some example questions and ways to prep, I’d suggest checking out my article on Scoutmaster Conferences!

12) Successfully complete your board of review for the Second Class rank.

Your final step is to complete your board of review! Schedule this with your advancement chair as soon as you’re ready, and go over what you completed one more time so you’re prepared. Remember, you got this! At this point, know you won’t fail. Good luck! 🙂

Congrats on Finishing Your Second Class Rank Requirements!

I know this was a pretty long guide, but I hope you learned a ton from it! When I was a Second Class Scout, I found it difficult to remember everything I read, but what really helped was to put what I’d learned into practice and teach others. Try it in your troop to also step up as a leader!

If you found this post helpful, I’ve also written guides to many of the other Eagle-required merit badges. I’d definitely recommend checking out my comprehensive difficulty rankings for every Eagle-required merit badge if you haven’t seen it already!

Great work, scout! You’re now ready to get out there and serve as an awesome Second Class Scout in your troop. Thanks for reading. I hope to see you at ScoutSmarts again soon and, until next time, I’m wishing you all the best on your Scouting journey!

(Click here to return to part 1 of my guide to the BSA Second Class Rank Requirements!)

Cole

I'm constantly writing new content because I believe in Scouts like you! Thanks so much for reading, and for making our world a better place. Until next time, I'm wishing you all the best on your journey to Eagle and beyond!

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