Tenderfoot Rank Requirement Answers: A Scout’s Guide In 2022


If you’re working on earning your Tenderfoot rank, you’re in the right place! In this guide, I’ll be teaching you all the info you’ll need to answer each of the BSA’s Tenderfoot rank requirements. Along the way, you’ll learn essential Scouting skills that’ll help you to reach Eagle!

You’ve reached part 2 of my ultimate guide to the BSA Tenderfoot rank! If you’re new to ScoutSmarts, you should first check out part 1 for the answers to requirements 1-4a for your Tenderfoot rank.

If you’ve come over from part one, congratulations! You’re halfway finished. Once you earn your Tenderfoot rank, you’ll have all of the skills needed to be an intermediate scout and keep up with your troop through almost any activity. Great job making it this far! 😉

Enough said, let’s get back to learning! First, take a minute to closely review and think through requirements 4-11 of the Tenderfoot rank. Then, I’ll help you to understand each requirement so that you can discuss these skills with your Scoutmaster and get them signed off. Time to dive in!

What Are The Tenderfoot Rank Requirement Answers?

  1. FIRST AID AND NATURE
    a. Show first aid for the following:
    —Simple cuts and scrapes
    —Blisters on the hand and foot
    —Minor (thermal/heat) burns or scalds (superficial, or first degree)
    —Bites or stings of insects or ticks
    —Venomous snakebite
    —Nosebleed
    —Frostbite and sunburn
    —Choking
    b. Describe common poisonous or hazardous plants, identify any that grow in your local area or campsite location. Tell how to treat for exposure to them.
    c. Tell what you can do on a campout or other outdoor activity to prevent or reduce the occurrence of injuries or exposure listed in Tenderfoot requirements 4a and 4b.
    d. Assemble a personal first-aid kit to carry with you on future campouts and hikes. Tell how each item in the kit would be used.
  2. HIKING
    a. Explain the importance of the buddy system as it relates to your personal safety on outings and in your neighborhood. Use the buddy system while on a troop or patrol outing.
    b. Explain what to do if you become lost on a hike or campout.
    c. Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night.
  3. FITNESS
    a. Record your best in the following tests:
    —Pushups________(Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
    —Situps or curl-ups________(Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
    —Back-saver sit-and-reach________(Record the distance stretched)
    —1 mile walk/run________(Record the time)
    b. Develop and describe a plan for improvement in each of the activities listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a. Keep track of your activity for at least 30 days.
    c. Show improvement (of any degree) in each activity listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a after practicing for 30 days.
    —Pushups________(Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
    —Situps or curl-ups________(Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
    —Back-saver sit-and-reach________(Record the distance stretched)
    —1 mile walk/run________(Record the time)
  4. CITIZENSHIP
    a. Demonstrate how to display, raise, lower, and fold the U.S. flag.
    b. Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto.
  5. LEADERSHIP
    a. Describe the steps in Scouting’s Teaching EDGE method. Use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another person how to tie the square knot.
  6. SCOUT SPIRIT
    a. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law in your everyday life.
  7. While working toward Tenderfoot rank, and after completing Scout rank requirement 7, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
  8. Successfully complete your board of review for the Tenderfoot rank.

Requirements 4b-4d: First Aid

4b) Describe common poisonous or hazardous plants, identify any that grow in your local area or campsite location. Tell how to treat for exposure to them.

Once you’ve spent a few months outdoors with your troop, there’s a good chance you’ll encounter some poisonous or hazardous plants. Without proper knowledge of what dangerous plants look like or where they grow, you could easily stumble upon them and end up in a lot of pain or discomfort.

Below, I’ll list the most common poisonous and hazardous plants that you’re likely to encounter on an outing. After making your way through this list, research which ones are common in your area by Googling, “poisonous/hazardous plants (your state).” Then, I challenge you to try to find some others that I didn’t mention! 😀

  • Poison Ivy: Did you know that poison ivy is found in every US state except for Alaska and Hawaii? Poison ivy can be identified by its characteristic three leaves, hence the saying “Leaves of three, let it be.” The middle leaf will be longer than the two on the sides, and the plant will grow as either a vine or a shrub.
  • Poison Oak: Poison oak is most commonly found on the West Coast and South and has many similarities to poison ivy. Poison oak also grows as vines or shrubs and can the recognized based on their 3-leafed structure. The main difference in appearance is that poison oak’s leaves tend to be larger and rounder.
  • Poison Sumac: Poison sumac grows on the East Coast, in the Northwest, and in the South. Unlike its other two counterparts, poison sumac grows as a bush or tree and has multiple leaves per stalk with a single leaf at the end. The leaves are oblong and smooth, and you may see white or light-green berries.
  • Cactus: There are many different varieties of castus, but most all of them are covered in sharp spikesthat can puncture skin and cause infection. If you’re in an area with lots of cacti, its important to wear close-toed shoes and be careful not to bump into anything.

The treatments for touching poison ivy, oak, sumac, and most other poisonous plants are the same — If you notice itchiness and/or skin rash and suspect one of these three culprits, wash your hands and the affected area thoroughly. Avoid scratching! You can alleviate itchiness with hydrocortisone cream and cool compresses.

If the symptoms don’t improve after a few days, seek medical attention. However, if exposure is extreme or you see signs of an allergic reaction, go to the emergency room immediately.

There are also many types of plants that are only poisonous when eaten (especially mushrooms) but can be touched. If you or someone else accidentally consumes a poisonous plant but is still conscious, call poison control at (800) 222-1222. In bad cases, they can send out emergency dispatch services.

Remember, don’t eat random berries off trees or any other potentially appetizing plants you come across unless you’re 100% sure of what they are. When in doubt, ask a Scoutmaster first. This is the best way to ensure that you and your Scouting buddies all stay safe and healthy!

4c) Tell what you can do on a campout or other outdoor activity to prevent or reduce the occurrence of injuries or exposure listed in Tenderfoot requirements 4a and 4b.

As you’ve probably heard many times before, prevention is key! Being aware of your surroundings and keeping an eye out for possible hazards can save you a lot of trouble. Here’s a quick recap of all the injuries we went over in Tenderfoot requirement 4a, along with measures you can take to prevent them.

Simple cuts and scrapesAvoid sharp objects and watch your foot placement while hiking.
Blisters on the hand and footWear comfortable, well-fitting shoes and carry protective bandages. Avoid touching anything that may be extremely hot, cold, or poisonous.
Minor burns or scaldsBe aware and cautious around hot liquids and surfaces.
Bites or stings of insects or ticksAvoid exposing your bare skin to grassy/brushy/wooded areas when possible, and shower as soon as you’re back from your outing. Wear bug spray. If you come across a bee or wasp, stay calm and move away slowly.
Venomous snakebiteStay on established trails. If you see a snake, don’t provoke it and move away slowly.
NosebleedTry to keep the inside of your nose moist. Don’t pick, blow, or rub your nose too hard.
Frostbite and sunburnThis boils down to weather preparedness. If it’s going to be a cold trip, dress accordingly, avoid cotton clothing that doesn’t dry well, and bring supplies to keep yourself warm. If it’s going to be hot, wear lightweight clothing, stay in the shade, and reapply sunscreen to avoid getting burnt.
ChokingEat slowly, chew your food thoroughly, don’t take enormous bites, and sit upright.
Poisonous/hazardous plantsBe able to recognize common/local poisonous plants and, for fun, point out any that you see while on outings.

Most of what I said above can be summed up with staying aware. Always be aware of your surroundings, the weather, and the other people you’re with. Staying conscious and aware is the first step toward avoiding potential disasters!

4d) Assemble a personal first-aid kit to carry with you on future campouts and hikes. Tell how each item in the kit would be used.

For both the Tenderfoot rank and the First Aid merit badge, you’ll need to assemble a first aid kit and explain what each component is used for. I’d recommend getting the All-inclusive Monoki Survival First Aid Kit, and then selecting specific components to create a more personalized and compact one. 🙂

For an example of how to structure a custom first aid kit, check out the informative video (3:26) below. While you likely won’t need to include every item the speaker packs, think through the potential emergencies you could encounter with your troop, and prepare your first aid kit for that!

I went over this topic in much more detail for requirement 5 of my First Aid merit badge guide, so check that out for more tips! Remember, it’s good to have a first aid kit with you at all times, not just while hiking or camping. I personally like to keep one in my home, and another in my car.

Requirement 5a-5c: Hiking

Hiking is a key component of your Scouting experience since it’s such a great way to explore nature, stay active, and have fun! In this requirement, you’ll learn about the buddy system, what to do if you get lost, and some basic safety rules to follow when hiking.

5a) Explain the importance of the buddy system as it relates to your personal safety on outings and in your neighborhood. Use the buddy system while on a troop or patrol outing.

You’ve probably heard of the buddy system since day 1 of Scouting, so I’ll keep this one short. The buddy system is when two people — you and your buddy — travel together and watch out for each other. If something were to happen to you or your buddy, the other person would call for help.

For this requirement, you’ll be explaining the relationship between the buddy system and personal safety to your Scoutmaster. Lastly, you’ll need to use the buddy system while on a scout excursion. Good luck! The buddy system is super important for safety reasons, so make sure to always keep it in mind. 🙂

5b) Explain what to do if you become lost on a hike or campout.

Fingers crossed that you’ll never get lost on an outing. However, if you do get lost, you’ll want to stay calm and use the acronym S.T.O.P. The S.T.O.P. method gives you steps that will help you find your way back. Here’s what each letter stands for:

  • Stop: Stop where you are and remain calm. Wandering further could get you even more lost.
  • Think: Now, it’s time to think. How did you get to where you are? Did you take a wrong turn? What was the last recognizable landmark that you saw? Can you retrace your steps?
  • Observe: Look at your surroundings. Try to spot any landmarks that could lead you back and listen for voices.
  • Plan: Make a plan to backtrack or get to a known location. Try to conserve energy and keep yourself comfortable. If all else fails, make yourself easily identifiable and signal for help.

Also, immediately after realizing you’re lost, call for help as loudly as you can. The rest of your troop could still be within earshot, so this is your best chance for being quickly found. A whistle is great to bring along on hikes for this reason, as it’ll allow you to easily make a very loud distress signal!

If you ever do find yourself lost on a hike, never abandon the trail. Always try to remain in the same place, as this will increase your likelihood of being found. Also, if it’s close to nighttime and the elements are harsh, creating a good shelter that’s out of the wind is first and foremost.

5c) Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night.

Last but not least, we’ll go over a few more hiking safety tips. You may be hiking on the highway or cross-country so you’ll need to follow some general rules. Here’s a list of some basic things to remember the next time you’re out hiking:

  1. Use the buddy system and avoid hiking alone
  2. If you get lost, follow the STOP method
  3. Stay on the path
  4. Plan ahead and know the route
  5. Dress appropriately for the weather
  6. Bring food
  7. Carry sunscreen
  1. Have relevant tools (flashlight, knife, etc.)
  2. Bring a first aid kit
  3. Have a map and compass
  4. Bring plenty of water
  5. Tell others where you’ll be going and when you plan to return
  6. Don’t overexert yourself. Rest as needed.

These are some best practices for hiking so make sure you know them. Your troop may have some more specific rules, which you should discuss with your Scoutmaster. Have fun and stay safe! 🙂

Requirements 6a-6c: Fitness

Keeping yourself physically strong is an important part of the Scout Oath. Luckily, this doesn’t mean you need to look like Arnold Schwarzenegger. 😛 However, you should put in some effort to be in good physical shape and have enough strength to reliably help your troop. In this section, we’ll be focusing on fitness!

6a) Record your best in the following tests:
—Pushups (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
—Situps or curl-ups (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
—Back-saver sit-and-reach (Record the distance stretched)
—1 mile walk/run (Record the time)

For the first part of this requirement, you’ll need to complete four different exercises and record your performance in each. You’ll be doing pushups, sit-ups, a sit-and-reach, and then walking or running a mile! Let’s start with pushups…

If you’ve never done pushups before, or aren’t too great at them, getting the form right can be hard. While completing a high number of pushups may sound cool, making sure your form is right is definitely the most important part for any of these exercises!

To start this off, you’ll need to complete as many correct pushups as you can in 60 seconds. Record this number. If you’re unsure about how to do a pushup correctly, I’ve included a quick video guide (3:37) that’ll walk you through getting great form:

Making sure your form is correct is crucial for avoiding injuries and actually building strength correctly. If this method is too hard though, try a modified version where you drop to your knees and practice pushups that way. Focus on technique, and I know you’ll get it!

The next exercise you’ll need to complete is sit-ups or curl-ups. The main difference between the two is that sit-ups lift your entire back off the ground at once, while curl-ups are done by just curling your head, shoulders, and upper back off the floor, in sequence (like you’re “curling upward!”).

Here’s a great video demonstration (2:15) of how to correctly do a curl-up by the Navy. Keep in mind you may need a second person to help hold your feet down, so feel free to recruit a buddy!

Unlike other tests in this requirement, the back-saver sit-and-reach doesn’t require strength or endurance. Instead, it tests your flexibility by measuring your reach distance. This is one exercise you may not have heard of before so be sure to check out this video demo (0:33):

The final portion of this requirement is a one-mile walk/run. You’re allowed to walk or run (most likely a combination of both). This one is pretty straightforward but will take longer to complete. Once finished, don’t forget to record your mile time in your Scout Handbook!

6b) Develop and describe a plan for improvement in each of the activities listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a. Keep track of your activity for at least 30 days.

Now comes the most difficult part of this requirement. You’ll need to come up with a plan to improve your performance in each of the above exercises! Then, you’ll need to track and record your progress in each exercise over the course of 30 days.

I know what you’re thinking– doing the same exercises over and over can get tedious really quickly. However, this is a chance to get creative! You don’t have to do each of the exercises for a month. Instead, you can do other exercises that improve similar muscle groups or abilities.

For instance, instead of sit-and-reach, you could work on other hamstring stretches like touching your toes. Crunches or planks would be a great way to improve your sit-up and pushup abilities as well. There are lots of different options. Just make sure to keep track of what you’re doing!

6c) Show improvement (of any degree) in each activity listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a after practicing for 30 days.
—Pushups (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
—Situps or curl-ups (Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
—Back-saver sit-and-reach (Record the distance stretched)
—1 mile walk/run (Record the time)

Now it’s time to show off your hard work! After you’ve practiced these exercises for a month, you should be able to see some improvement. Even if your progress is minor, progress is progress! You should feel proud of yourself. Great job scout! 😀

Plus, even after you’ve finished this requirement, I’d highly encourage you to continue exercising and building your strength. The goal of this challenge was for you to see, firsthand, that you can really improve if you put your mind to it. Exercise has a ton of healthy benefits, so keep it up!

Requirements 7a-7b: Citizenship

One major tenet of Scouting is respecting your nation. This is echoed through the Scout Oath that states, “I will do my best to my God and my country.” In order to fulfill this part of your Oath, you’ll learn flag ceremony skills as well as how to give back to your community.

7a) Demonstrate how to display, raise, lower, and fold the U.S. flag.

For your Tenderfoot rank, you’ll need to show how to display, raise, lower, and fold the US flag. Not only is this a way to show respect to your nation, but it’s also something that will come in handy for flag ceremonies, which are a big part of your scouting experience.

I have a detailed guide on proper flag skills and etiquette that will walk you through each step in as simple a way as possible, so I’d highly recommend checking it out. Flag etiquette is something you want to get right, so follow the guide carefully!

7b) Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto.

Service hours are another major part of your Scouting experience. In the back of your handbook, there is a section where you can keep track of these hours. This is something you’ll want to stay on top of since service hours are required for nearly every rank.

Finishing this particular requirement should be pretty easy, as scouts are always racking up service hours. I’d suggest helping out with an Eagle Scout Project in your troop. Run the idea by your Scoutmaster, beforehand, and be sure to log your hours.

The last part of this requirement asks you to relate your one hour of service to the Scout Slogan and Scout motto. How did you exemplify the ideals of “Do a Good Turn Daily” and “Be Prepared?” Think about it and be able to explain it to your Scoutmaster!

Requirement 8a: Leadership

As you become a more experienced scout, you’ll also assume more leadership roles. Leadership is one of the most important skills to have and will help you both inside and outside of Scouting.

In this particular requirement, you’ll be practicing your leadership skills by using Scouting’s Teaching EDGE Method to effectively teach another person a skill. If you aren’t familiar with the EDGE method, give the previous article a quick read, as it should really help!

8a) Describe the steps in Scouting’s Teaching EDGE method. Use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another person how to tie the square knot.

The square knot is one of the easiest and most useful knots you’ll learn. Before you teach it to anyone though, you’ll need to learn how to tie it properly. This knot is pretty simple, but I’ve included a short video guide (1:23) to help you master the process so that you can teach it yourself:

Now that you’re a pro at tying this knot, it’s time to use the EDGE method to teach it to a fellow scout. Remember, Explain, Demonstrate, Guide, and Enable! Here’s how I’d teach a square knot using the EDGE method:

  1. Explain: First, I’d cover what a square knot is (one of the easiest Scouting knots to tie/untie), what it’s used for (used to join 2 ropes), and how it’s tied (go right over left, left over right).
  2. Demonstrate: Then, I’d show them how to tie a square knot very slowly, stopping to describe any section in more detail if they had questions.
  3. Guide: After that, I’d have them take the rope themselves and slowly perfrom the right over left, left over right movement to tie a square knot.
  4. Enable: Finally, I’d tell them that 2 ropes near the campsite need to be joined together to help secure the fly (or for some other reason). At that point, they should be enabled to tie the ropes together, all by themselves! 🙂

Requirement 9a: Scout Spirit

The idea of “Scout Spirit” will pop up often in your various rank requirements. Requirements relating to Scout Spirit are pretty simple but require some self-reflection and understanding of the Scout Oath and Law.

9a) Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law in your everyday life.

For this requirement, think back to your Scouting activities and everyday life. What four points of the Scout Law have you lived by? Have you been trustworthy, friendly, courteous, cheerful, or brave? What actions have you taken that demonstrate this? Be ready to explain.

If you’d like a hand with this, I’ve actually written a full article on what Scout Spirit means, along with a ton of examples of Scout Spirit as it ties back to the Scout Law. You should definitely check that out if you want to improve as a leader and get the most out of Scouting!

Requirements 10 & 11: Your Scoutmaster Conference and Board of Review

This is the final test of your Tenderfoot rank! It’s time to reflect on what you’ve learned and describe your growth during your Board of Review and to your Scoutmaster. I’ll give you a couple of tips, but this is something that you’ll need to take charge of. I know you can do it!

10) While working toward Tenderfoot rank, and after completing Scout rank requirement 7, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

The Scoutmaster conference is a time to discuss your experience in Scouting with your Scoutmaster. However, don’t be nervous — this shouldn’t be a retest of the previous requirements. Instead, this conference is a great opportunity to explain what you’ve been liking, disliking, and to get some feedback.

Your typical Scoutmaster conference will be more like a conversation than a test. Your Scoutmaster will likely ask you a few questions like, “What have been your favorite parts of Scouting so far?” and “Have you had any difficulties?” They just want to hear from you and get honest feedback!

If you’re still a bit unsure, check out my article on Preparing For A Scoutmaster Conference. In it, you’ll also learn a few more questions you’re likely to be asked. Also, make sure to schedule your conference in advance! It’ll probably take around 20 minutes and shouldn’t be rushed.

11) Successfully complete your board of review for the Tenderfoot rank.

You’re almost there! For your Board, you’ll want to make sure your uniform is put together correctly, you have your handbook, and you know the Scout Oath, Law, Slogan, and Motto. Keep in mind what you did in this rank, and you’re good to go. You’re more than ready! 😀

Congratulations On Completing Your Tenderfoot Rank Requirements!

Give yourself a huge pat on the back for getting this far! I know that you’re probably still getting used to Scouting, but this is a giant step, and you should be proud of yourself! You’re now well on your way to Eagle. I really hope my guide helped you out!

If you liked this article, I’ve also written helpful guides for many of the Eagle-required merit badges! I’d definitely recommend checking out my comprehensive difficulty rankings for every Eagle-required merit badge if you haven’t seen it already.

Great work, scout! You’re now ready to get out there and start working on earning your Second Class rank. Thanks for reading, and for making our country a better place through your actions. I hope to see you at ScoutSmarts again soon and, until next time, I’m wishing you all the best on your Scouting journey! 🙂

(Click here to return to part 1 of my guide to the BSA Tenderfoot Rank)

Cole

I'm constantly writing new content because I believe in Scouts like you! Thanks so much for reading, and for making our world a better place. Until next time, I'm wishing you all the best on your journey to Eagle and beyond!

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