The Archery Merit Badge: Your Ultimate Guide In 2024


Are you interested in becoming a skilled archer? If so, you’re in the right place! Welcome to my ultimate guide for Scouts earning their Archery Merit Badge. Here, I’ll walk you through everything you’ll need to know about archery to be prepared, knowledgeable, and safe during your journey!

Whether you’re practicing aim or hunting game, archery is an incredibly popular sport that relies on precision, control, and focus. In fact, practically every Scout will try out archery at least once during a summer camp. As an Eagle Scout, I’m included in that! That’s why, I’ll be helping you to better understand the wonderful art of archery in this guide. 😀

If youd like my help with any Eagle-required badges, you should definitely check out my Difficulty Ranking Guide to Every Eagle-required Badge. There, you’ll also find the links to my other merit badge guides, as well as a description and summary of each badge’s requirements. I know this resource will be helpful to Scouts on their road to Eagle!

Also, remember that ScoutSmarts should just serve as your starting point for merit badge research. In school, we’re taught not to plagiarize, and the same is true for Scouting worksheets. Answer these questions in your own words, do further research, and I promise you’ll gain much more from every merit badge you earn!

Are you ready to fire off and start learning? Great! First, take a minute to thoroughly read through each of the Archery merit badge requirements listed below. Then, I’ll be taking you step-by-step through each answer so that you can become a confident, safe, and accurate archer.

Alright then, time to get going. Let’s take aim at understanding all of the requirements and earning your Archery merit badge!

What Are The Archery Merit Badge Requirements?

  1. Do the following:
    • 1a. Name and point out the parts of an arrow.
      1b. Describe three or more different types of arrows.
      1c. Name the four principle materials for making arrow shafts.
      1d. Do ONE of the following:
      • I. Make a complete arrow from a bare shaft using appropriate equipment available to you.
        Or…
        II. To demonstrate arrow repair, inspect the shafts and prepare and replace at least three vanes, one point, and one nock. You may use as many arrows as necessary to accomplish this. The repairs can be done on wood, fiberglass, or aluminum arrows.
    • e. Explain how to properly care for and store arrows.
  2. Do the following:
    • 2a. Explain the five range safety rules.
      2b. Explain the four whistle commands used on the range.
      2c. Explain how to safely remove arrows from the target and return them to your quiver.
      2d. Tell about your local and state laws for owning and using archery equipment.
  3. Do the following:
    • 3a. Explain the proper use, care, and storage of, as well as the reasons for using tabs, arm guards, shooting gloves, and quivers.
      3b. Explain the following terms: draw length, draw weight, mechanical release, and barebow.
  4. Explain the following:
    • 4a. The difference between an end and a round
      4b. The differences among field, target, and 3-D archery
      4c. How the five-color World Archery Federation target is scored
      4d. How the National Field Archery Association (NFAA) black-and-white field targets and blue indoor targets are scored
  5. Do ONE of the following options:
    • Option A – Using a Recurve Bow or Longbow
      5a. Name and Point to the parts of the recurve bow or longbow you are shooting.
      5b. Explain how to properly care for and store recurve bows and longbows.
      5c. Demonstrate and explain USA Archery’s “Steps of Shooting” for the bow you are shooting.

      5d. Demonstrate the proper way to string a recurve bow or longbow.
      5e. Using a bow square, locate and mark with dental floss, crimp-on, or other method, the nocking point on the bowstring of the bow you are using.
      5f. Do ONE of the following:
    • I. Using a recurve bow or longbow and arrows with a finger release, shoot a single round of ONE of the following BSA, USA Archery, or NFAA rounds:
      • a. An NFAA field round of 14 targets and make a score of 60 points
        b. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 80 points

        c. A World Archery/USA Archery indoor round and make a score of 80 points
        d. An NFAA indoor round and make a score of 50 points
        (The indoor rounds may be shot outdoors if this is more convenient.)
    • II. Shooting 30 arrows in five-arrow ends at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 10 yards and using the 10 scoring regions, make a score of 150 points.
      III. As a member of the USA Archery Junior Olympic Archery Development Program (JOAD), earn your indoor or outdoor green, purple, and gray achievement award pins using a recurve bow or longbow.
      IV. As a member of the NFAA’s Junior Division, earn a Cub or Youth 100-score Progression patch.
    • Option B – Using a Compound Bow
      5a. Name and point to the parts of the compound bow you are shooting.
      5b. Explain how to properly care for and store compound bows.

      5c. Demonstrate and explain USA Archery’s “Steps of Shooting” for the bow you are shooting.
      5d. Explain why it is necessary to have the string or cable on a compound bow replaced at an archery shop.
      5e. Locate and mark with dental floss, crimp-on, or other method, the nocking point on the bowstring of the bow you are using.
      5f. Do ONE of the following:
    • I. Using a compound bow and arrows with a finger release, shoot a single round of ONE of the following BSA, USA Archery, or NFAA rounds:
      • a. An NFAA field round of 14 targets and make a score of 70 points.
        b. A BSA Scout field round of 14 targets and make a score of 90 points.

        c. A World Archery/USA Archery indoor round and make a score of 90 points.
        d. An NFAA indoor round and make a score of 50 points.
        (The indoor rounds may be shot outdoors if this is more convenient.)
    • II. Shooting at an 80-centimeter (32-inch) five-color target at 15 yards and using the 10 scoring regions, make a minimum score of 160 points. Accomplish this in the following manner:
      • Shoot 15 arrows in five-arrow ends, at a distance of 10 yards.
        AND Shoot 15 arrows in five-arrow ends, at a distance of 15 yards.
    • III. As a member of the USA Archery Junior Olympic Archery Development Program (JOAD), earn your indoor or outdoor green, purple, and gray achievement award pins using a compound bow.
      IV. As a member of the NFAA’s Junior Division, earn a Cub or Youth 100-score Progression patch.
1a) Explain the five range safety rules.

Before you can fire off your first arrow, it’s important to know how to stay safe when practicing archery. As you probably already know, bows and arrows were used as lethal weapons throughout history, and I’m sure you don’t want to accidentally impale any of your Scout buddies! That’s why safety is first and foremost when it comes to archery.

Fun fact: Did you know archery is the national sport of Bhutan? It was declared their national sport in 1971 after they joined the United Nations. Bhutan is the only country in the world whose national sport is archery. In fact, nearly every village in Bhutan has an archery range!

Luckily, safety is a pretty simple matter if you follow a few easy instructions! To prevent any mishaps or accidents, be sure to practice these five archery range safety rules at all times:

  1. Listen for and follow the instructions of the range commander: Always pay close attention and listen to the range commander’s instructions. If you’re unsure about anything, make sure to speak up and ask for clarification!
  2. Always use proper safety equipment: This includes an arm guard and finger protector/glove. If you’re new to the sport, make sure your Scoutmaster or the instructor checks your equipment to ensure it is on correctly. Proper equipment prevents injuries like bow string slaps and will help to keep you safe.
  3. Do not point a bow or arrow at another person: Never point your bow at anything you don’t intend to shoot. This means you only ever aim at a target and never aim it at a person or anything outside of the range (we’re Scouts, not Legolas!). Even if you don’t intend to shoot, your bow should never be aimed away from downrange, at anything besides the target.
  4. Never release your arrow at an upward or downward angle: While this seems like fun in the movies, in real life, this can result in serious injuries. So, always shoot horizontally, toward your target. If you shoot upward, you’ll have no control over where the arrow will fall, which could cause someone to get seriously injured, or even killed.
  5. Remove arrows only when the all-clear signal has been given: Do not retrieve your arrows until the all-clear signal has been given, everyone has completed shooting, and all bows are set down. This means you must remain behind the firing line and away from targets until the range has been declared safe.

While these are the 5 main range safety rules that you’ll likely be told by your instructor during your first lesson, here are some bonus archery safety tips that you should also always keep in mind:

  • Wear snug-fitting clothes, tie back long hair, remove large earrings, and set aside any decorative pins or items in a chest pocket.
  • Inspect your equipment for any damage prior to shooting.
  • Walk, never run, when on or near the range.
  • Always use the arrows that are of suitable length for you.
  • Make sure you always have parental permission and qualified supervision before engaging in archery activities.
  • Keep your arrows safely in the quiver until you’re ready to shoot.

Although we just covered all of the main safety measures to keep in mind, you could also check out Backyard Sidekick’s article for a more complete guide to archery range rules and etiquette. Knowing how to conduct yourself properly, with good manners, on a real range is a super useful skill to have!

Now, before we go any further, I want to share with you a super helpful video (5:56) explaining some of the most important archery basics that beginners tend to get wrong. Keeping these tips in mind will reduce your risks of injury and make you more likely to be the best archer in your troop!

Definitely check this video out before you first step onto the range. Even just a bit of knowledge about positioning, guard usage, draw distance, and aiming will be sure to help you out a ton and make your archery experience even more fun!

1b) Explain the four whistle commands used on the range.

Who doesn’t love whistling?! 🙂 While whistling is really fun, it’s also an important part of safety on archery ranges.

Whistling is used to call out instructions on the range, so there’s no confusion about what all archers need to do. However, if you aren’t familiar with the whistle commands, don’t worry! In this section, you’ll be learning all of the main whistle commands to listen out for.

  1. First Whistle: Two Blasts
    • Verbal: “Archers to the shooting line.”
    • Meaning: Pick up the bow and move from the waiting line into position on the shooting line. Do NOT pick up the arrows.
  1. Second Whistle: One Blast
    • Verbal: “Begin Shooting”
    • Meaning: Archers may take the arrows out of the quivers and begin shooting.
  1. Third Whistle: Three Blasts
    • Verbal: “Retrieve your arrows,”
    • Meaning: Shooting is completed. Archers must set their bows down and remain behind the waiting line until all bows are down. Then, they can go and retrieve their arrows from the target.
  1. Fourth: Four or More Blasts (Series of Blasts)
    • Verbal: “STOP, STOP, STOP, STOP” or CEASE FIRE”
    • Meaning: Immediately let down and put arrows back in the quiver, and step back behind the waiting line. There is an emergency on the range.

Whistle commands work this way for practically every archery range, so be sure to remember them well (Source: ScouterLife). Also, if you’re ever unsure of what to do, don’t shoot! Put down your bow, stand still, and look toward the range instructor for clarification.

1c) Explain how to safely remove arrows from the target and return them to your quiver.

Safely removing arrows from a target is an essential skill to avoid injury and prolong the life of your equipment. Most mishaps happen during this step of arrow retrieval, so pay close attention! Here’s a step-by-step walkthrough for how to remove arrows and return them to your quiver properly:

  1.  Wait for permission: If you are shooting in a group or on a range, always wait for the range officer’s signal before approaching the target to retrieve your arrows. This ensures everyone’s safety and prevents the possibility of someone shooting while anyone is down range.
  2. Approach the target cautiously: Walk carefully towards the target, keeping any arrows you have pointing down (you want to stab the dirt, not a person, should there be an accident 😛). Avoid sudden movements or running as this increases risks for yourself and others.
  3. Grasp the arrow by the shaft: When removing the arrow from the target, firmly grip the shaft (the non-pointy end) of the arrow. Never touch the arrowhead or broadhead; they can be very sharp and cause injury. 
  4. Wiggle and pull gently: To remove the arrow, gently wiggle it from side to side while applying consistent, even pressure backward. Avoid jerking or forcing the arrow out, as this may damage the arrow or the target.
  5. Check the target: After removing the arrow, examine the target for any signs of damage or wear. Look for torn or damaged material that could potentially cause arrow deflection or create unsafe shooting conditions.
  6. Return arrows to your quiver: If your arrows are in good condition, carefully place them back into your quiver. Ensure that the fletching (feathers or vanes) is positioned correctly so they don’t get damaged or cause issues when you shoot again.

For all of you visual learners out there, here’s a quick and helpful video (2:04) demonstrating how to safely remove an arrow:

Fun Fact: You’ve probably heard cheetahs are pretty fast and can reach almost 70 mph when sprinting. However, while we can’t have the zoomies like cheetahs, an arrow in a competition can travel as fast as 150 mph! That’s super fast, and also super dangerous. Archery is fun, but ALWAYS follow rules and regulations. Safety is paramount!

1d) Tell about your local and state laws for owning and using archery equipment.

Every state has its own laws and regulations for owning and using archery equipment, so it’s essential to research and understand the specific rules that apply to your area. Here’s a handy link outlining bow regulations by state, so check out your state when you can. Below I’ll be providing general laws and concerns to keep in mind.

While laws can vary by state and area, some common archery laws you may encounter will likely cover:

  1. Age restrictions: Most states have age restrictions for owning and practicing with archery equipment. Minors may require adult supervision or specific permits to participate in archery activities.
  2. Hunting regulations: If you plan to use archery equipment for hunting, there are usually specific hunting seasons, bag limits, and licensing requirements set by state or provincial wildlife agencies.
  3. Prohibited areas: Certain locations, such as public parks, schools, and residential areas, may restrict archery activities for safety reasons. Always use designated archery ranges or private properties with permission.
  4. Transportation laws: When transporting archery equipment, ensure it is appropriately stored and secured in compliance with local transportation laws.
  5. Public safety: Archery should be conducted in a manner that ensures public safety. Always be aware of your surroundings and keep a safe distance from others when shooting.
  6. Broadhead regulations: Some areas have specific regulations on using broadheads for hunting due to their potential lethality. Check if there are any restrictions on broadhead types for your area.
  7.  Permits and licenses: Depending on your location and the nature of your archery activities (recreational shooting, hunting, etc.), you may need to obtain specific permits or licenses.
  8. Noise regulations: Archery ranges located near residential areas may have specific noise regulations that participants must follow.
2a) Name and point out the parts of an arrow.

Next up, we’re learning about the parts of an arrow! To become a better archer, it’s important to first learn about the tools you’ll be using so that you can determine if everything is in working order. So, to help you out with that, let’s first talk about arrows!

As shown in this diagram, there are five main parts of an arrow:

The Arrow Shaft: The arrow shaft is like the spine of the arrow. Typically made of carbon, fiberglass, wood, or aluminum, the shaft needs to be very smooth and sturdy for maximum flight path and accuracy. A shaft that is too stiff causes a wild and unpredictable arrow. 

When firing an arrow, the shaft will actually bend as it is launched and will straighten during flight. By choosing an arrow material type that’s right for you, and consistently sticking to it, you’ll get a better feel for the flight path of your arrow and become a more accurate archer! I’d recommend aluminum or fiberglass shafts for newer archers.

The Insert: Inserts attach the arrow point to the shaft at the front of the arrow. They tend to be glued inside the arrow once they are cut to the right length. Inserts can be made of a brass combination, steel, or plastic, but most are made of aluminum. They ensure the arrowhead is securely attached.


The Arrow Fletching: The fletching is the synthetic feather near the base of an arrow. Fletching acts to increase wind resistance, and can make the arrow spin like a bullet. This improves flight stability and accuracy. The fletching is made of three or more feathers (also called vanes).

The “cock” feather is the one feather that is colored differently than the others. The reaming feathers are called “hen” feathers. The cock feather should always be positioned perpendicular (at a 90 angle) to the arrow nock when shooting.

Arrow Nock: The nock is the slotted plastic tip that the bowstring is latched onto when firing. It stabilizes the arrow at the back. The “nocking point” is a specific location on the bowstring where the arrows are nocked. This spot can be adjusted by moving it up or down the bowstring.

Fun Fact: There are actually two main types of arrow nocks–Regular and Lighted!

  • Regular arrow nocks are made from plastic, wood, and sometimes even bone. They come in a lot of fun colors and push back into the arrow. For traditional archery hunters, there are also glue-on nocks made for wood or bamboo arrows. 
    • A strong glue like epoxy is typically used to attach Regular nocks. It’s important that your nock fits the arrow shaft and bowstring diameter of your bow, so be sure to buy the correct ones! 
  • Lighted arrow nocks cause the nock of an arrow to glow, and are battery-powered. These are like tracer rounds — but for arrows! Not only does this feature make an arrow look even cooler in flight, but it will also help in tracing and locating your arrow after you’ve shot.
    • Check out the cool video (0:33) below to see a lighted arrow nock in action!

Arrowhead: Now, on to the final part of an arrow… the arrowhead! This is the pointed tip you’ll hit targets with. Many different kinds of arrow points are available, each with a different purpose and advantage. Most arrows you’ll be using are “field points”, and have a bullet-shaped design. However, some arrows have sharper heads and are used for game hunting.

2b) Describe three or more different types of arrows.

Wooden Arrows

Wooden arrows (example) are made for longbows and conventional bows. These arrows can be made from different types of wood like cedar, pine, or spruce. The type of wood used affects the stiffness. The barrels of these arrows are more aesthetically pleasing and customizable. However, they are also more brittle. The wooden arrow is less precise compared to aluminum arrows.

Aluminum Arrows

Aluminum arrows (example) are versatile and can be used for conventional and compound bows. These arrows are lighter and more precise than wooden arrows and are frequently used in club and indoor shooting. These arrows are durable, can be reshaped if warped, and are often on the more inexpensive end, so they’re excellent for beginners!

Carbon Arrows

The carbon arrow (example), made of carbon fiber, is the most frequently used arrow type for competitions and by serious archers. However, these arrows are appropriate for all shooting sports and activities, including hunting and target shooting. However, these arrows are often on the pricier end, making them less common among beginners.

If you’re a Scout who will be shooting on a range, aluminum or fiberglass arrows will probably be best to buy due to their price point and durability. However, once you gain skills as an archer, you may want to invest in a quality set of carbon arrows!

For help with deciding what arrow to use depending on your bow type, check out this handy chart:

Shooting disciplineType of Arrow
For longbowsWooden and carbon arrows.
For recurve bowsWooden arrows, carbon arrows (especially for outdoor shooting), aluminum arrows (for indoor shooting), and carbon aluminum arrows.
For recurve bowsWood and aluminum arrows.
For compound bowsCarbon (for target shooting), aluminum, and carbon aluminum arrows.
2c) Name the four principle materials for making arrow shafts.

There are four principal materials used to make arrow shafts: wood, aluminum, carbon fiber, and fiberglass. It’s important to know the qualities of each material and how they might affect an arrow’s flight.

  1. Wood: This is the most traditional material for making arrow shafts. There are a variety of types used, and each has different characteristics. For example, cedar is lightweight and straight-grained, so it is perfect for making straight and accurate arrows. Other types of wood used include oak and pine.
  2. Aluminum: Aluminum arrows are popular for their performance and durability. However, they are a bit heavier than carbon arrows and can warp over time more easily.
  3. Fiberglass: Fiberglass arrows are affordable, lightweight, and a great choice for beginner archers. Having a fiberglass shaft will make your arrow more durable and resistant to bending.
  4. Carbon Fiber: Carbon arrows are relatively modern, and popular for their lightweight, stiff, and highly consistent properties. They are generally more durable than aluminum or wood arrows and can travel faster as well. These characteristics make carbon arrows suitable for both hunting and target shooting.
  5. Composite (bonus): Composite arrows, often made from a combination of carbon and aluminum, provide the best of both worlds. They are light, and durable, and maintain the consistency of aluminum arrows while benefiting from the strength and speed of carbon arrows. These are typically the most expensive arrows you can buy and are often used by advanced or professional archers.

Remember, the right arrow shaft material will depend on your specific needs, the type of bow you are using, your experience, and the conditions in which you’ll be shooting. Also, while material is important to take into account, as a not-very-good archer myself, I didn’t notice a big difference when shooting with different types of arrows, so no need to overthink things! 😀

2d) Do ONE of the following:
I. Make a complete arrow from a bare shaft using appropriate equipment available to you.
Or… II. To demonstrate arrow repair, inspect the shafts and prepare and replace at least three vanes, one point, and one nock. You may use as many arrows as necessary to accomplish this. The repairs can be done on wood, fiberglass, or aluminum arrows.

For this requirement, I’d highly recommend purchasing and making the Arrow of Light Kit. This makes the process so easy, and will help to avoid lots of trips to the hardware store by giving you everything you’ll need to put together an arrow from a bare shaft, all in one place!

However, if you’d like to learn and demonstrate an arrow repair, here’s a great guide to repairing arrows and replacing vanes, created by ArcheryBoss. Also, below I’ve added a great video (6:12) showing you the basic process for re-fletching your arrows.

This is a useful skill to learn if you’re very passionate about archery and want to prolong the life of your equipment. So, make sure to check it out if you’re interested. The only way to get better is to practice, practice, practice! 🙂

2e) Explain how to properly care for and store arrows.

Self-care is often the most important part of keeping yourself healthy. This might include things like showering regularly, eating well, exercising, or getting a full night’s sleep. This looks different for everyone, but staying healthy and taking care of yourself helps you be your best.

Well, just like how you need to take care of yourself to perform your best, you need to take care of your arrows too! Follow these rules to ensure your arrows are stored properly and continue to perform well for many months to come:

  1. First, make sure your arrows are dry. Storing arrows when they are wet leads to a variety of issues like rust, warping, or rotting, and the feathers can degrade.
  2. Next, ensure you have an enclosed location for storing your arrows. Arrows should be kept away from direct sunlight, in a dry area that’s protected from extreme heat and cold.
    • Note: Specifically for wood or bamboo shafts, direct sunlight and extreme heat can damage shafts and bleach the color out of the feathers.
  3. Finally, store the arrows vertically in a rack or tube. You may want to consider using an arrow holder case (example) for arrow storage or transportation when traveling. 

On top of these essentials, here are a few bonus tips for Arrow Maintenance

  1. For wooden arrows, you should coat the shafts with varnish or Danish oil every few months. If you use carbon or aluminum arrows, you don’t need to worry about this.
  2. Arrow vanes (feathers) should be kept dry and waterproofed. Wet feathers damage the arrow’s performance as they become heavier, resulting in a slower flight.

Fun Fact: One experiment was conducted by an archer, Mark Stretton, to compare the speed differences between shooting dry and wet fletchings. The test result shows that wet fletching does slow the arrow down dramatically. You can read about his findings here

To dry your feathers, use an absorbent cloth to gently blot away moisture. Avoid rubbing or pressing too hard, as the feathers are delicate. Afterward, run your finger along the feathers from front to rear to remove the remaining water droplets. Dry the feathers completely before waterproofing the arrows.

  1. To waterproof your vanes, you can purchase a powder or spray (example) to repel moisture. This extends the life of your arrows. Carefully follow the instructions on the product for the best results.
  2. Check all parts of your bow and arrows regularly to ensure they are not loose, cracked, or rusted. If the points are rusting, you can use some wire wool to remove the rust.
  3. Pay special attention when checking your nocks to ensure they’re still properly attached and aligned with the feathers. You can give them a tiny pull to ensure they won’t slip off.
3a) Explain the proper use, care, and storage of, as well as the reasons for using tabs, arm guards, shooting gloves, and quivers.

Properly using, caring for, and storing your tabs, arm guards, shooting gloves, and quivers is crucial. Doing so will prolong the life of your equipment and give you a greater appreciation for archery. In this section, we’ll be discussing each of these types of equipment and explaining their importance.

Tabs

  • Use: A tab (example) protects your finger when drawing back and releasing the bowstring. This is especially important in traditional archery to ensure a smooth release and prevent blisters and calluses.
  • Care: After each use, you should inspect your tab for any damage, especially where the string is released. Over time, the leather can degrade. If it gets wet, allow it to dry naturally; don’t dry it with heat as this can make the leather brittle.
  • Storage: Keep the tab in a dry, ventilated place out of direct sunlight. You should avoid exposing it to excessive moisture, heat, or cold. A small pouch or pocket in your archery bag can keep it safe.

Arm Guards

  • Use: An arm guard (example) protects the inside of your bow arm from the bowstring’s slap upon release. This is especially important for beginners.
  • Care: Clean the arm guard regularly with a damp cloth and gentle soap if it’s made from leather. For synthetic materials, check the manufacturer’s care instructions.
  • Storage: Similar to tabs, keep arm guards in a dry and cool place. Ensure it’s not folded or under heavy items that might deform it.

Shooting Gloves

  • Use: Similar to tabs, shooting gloves (example) protect your fingers from the bowstring. Some archers prefer gloves for a better grip on the bowstring and overall feel.
  • Care: If your glove is leather, clean it with a damp cloth and allow it to dry naturally after use. You might want to use a leather conditioner occasionally to maintain its flexibility. For gloves made of synthetic materials, wash often and follow the manufacturer’s care instructions.
  • Storage: Store your shooting gloves in a dry, cool area. Avoid leaving them in a wet or damp environment as this can cause mold or mildew to grow.

Quivers

  • Use: A quiver (example) is used to hold your arrows. It can be attached to your body or the bow, or it could be a ground quiver. It keeps your arrows organized, easy to reach, and prevents them from getting damaged.
  • Care: Regularly inspect your quiver for any damage, particularly in the areas that hold the arrows. Clean the quiver with a damp cloth and allow it to dry naturally. For leather quivers, you might want to use a leather conditioner from time to time.
  • Storage: Keep the quiver in a cool and dry location when not in use. Avoid harsh conditions that may damage it. Remove the arrows when storing your quiver to maintain its structural integrity.

That’s a lot of information! Thank goodness I made you this handy cheat sheet to reference: 😛

EquipmentUse Care & Storage
Tabs Finger protection & smooth releaseKeep dry and away from direct sunlight. Can be stored in an archery bag.
Arm GuardsProtects the inside of bow arm Keep it unfolded, let it air out (as it could get smelly), and store in a cool, dry place
Shooting GlovesProtect fingers from bowstringWash often but allow to fully dry. Store in a dry area.
Quivers Holds arrowsClean with a damp cloth and look for arrow damage regularly. Keep out of direct sunlight, and store completely dry.

Bonus info: Choosing a tab or glove is important to protect yourself from potential accidents. What is just as important is finding one that you’re comfortable in. Keep these factors in mind when choosing a tab or glove:

  1. Material: Leather tabs and gloves are usually more durable and long-lasting, but they may also be more expensive. Synthetic materials, however, are often less expensive but less durable and sometimes confer less finger protection.
  2. Weather: The weather can also play a role in your decision. Leather tabs and gloves tend to be less breathable than synthetic materials, making them more uncomfortable to use in hot or humid weather. Synthetic materials may be more comfortable in these conditions but may not be as durable.
  3. Budget: Lastly, budget is also a factor to consider. Leather tabs and gloves are usually more expensive than synthetic materials, so if budget is a concern, synthetic materials may be a better option.

Ready to move on to requirement 3b) of the Archery mb? Click here!

Congrats on Finishing The First Half of The Archery Merit Badge!

We just covered a ton of useful archery info! Great work. Are you starting to feel like an experienced archer yet? Very soon, I bet you will! You definitely deserve a break at this point; give yourself a massive pat on the back. 🙂

Once you’re ready to continue on to part 2 of the Archery merit badge click here!
(Part 2 is in progress, subscribe to my newsletter for updates)

Also, if you’re interested in the difficulty rankings for every Eagle-required merit badge, you can check out my full guide here! PS: The article also links to my other ultimate badge guides that’ll help you to complete your merit badge worksheets.

Cole

I'm constantly writing new content because I believe in Scouts like you! Thanks so much for reading, and for making our world a better place. Until next time, I'm wishing you all the best on your journey to Eagle and beyond!

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